Geraldine

Vegan Style and beautiful women

43 posts in this topic

Hey everybody! :D

 

Wanted to share those amazing pics of two ladies I truly admire.

They are so inspiring!!

 

Before I show you, I want to tell that I want to become like them when I grow old :)

For the moment, I'm a vegetarian. I am since I'm 14 years old.  

I eat quite the same as Jasmine 23 (I saw in one of her post, she wrote  what she ate regularly.Quite the same as me) : fruits, vegetables, sometimes fish.

No pork. No meat.

And I saw PauljustPaul and mewaiting live in a veganstyle also.  :)

 

I am thinking of becoming a full vegan...But we will see...

 

So, now for the pictures :

 

 

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Full vegan and she is 73 years old this year! :o

Her website : http://www.annettelarkins.com/

 

 

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Ernestine Shepherd: 78 years old

She has been on the guiness record book! Not vegan nor vegetarian but eat healthy.

She is a bodybuilder http://ernestineshepherd.net/

 

I admire those women so much...I want to be like them

 

Quotes:

"Age is just a number" : Ernestine Shepherd

"Allow the years to make the best of you, not to take the best from you" :Annette Larkins

 

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Hey!

 

If you're interested, check out veganbodybuilding.com It's a great resource for vegan living, and has many profiles of GORGEOUS herbivorous women, discussing why and how they went vegan. Of course, veganism is different than a plant-based diet - veganism you do for the world around you, a plant-based diet you do for yourself.

 

Also check out the YouTube channel Bite Size Vegan. There are many terrific videos on veganism, whether it be navigating ethical dilemmas or ensuring you get all the nutrients you need (Hint: It's much easier than most people think). There are videos with vegan athletes and figure/physique competitors, as well as with top nutritionists. It's a fantastic resource.

 

CarolineWaits on this forum is also a vegan - when she came to visit Toronto in the summer, we had TONS of fun checking out different vegan restaurants. So her, mewaiting, and myself are all vegans who would be happy to answer any question you've got.

 

My best friend became a vegan after knowing me, and now has been so for 6 months. She has a new vigor for life, but she also looks healthier. She's lost some body fat, her skin is cleared up, and just looks more vibrant. She loves how she feels now, both in her body and soul.

 

So please, if you ever have any questions, post them here, or message me, I'd be more than happy to shed any kind of insight.

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Hi here also Geraldine!

 

First of all, congrats for your lifestyle. It's not easy to be a vegetarian or a vegan today. In fact it's not easy to have any healthy diet today, vegetarian/vegan or normal. I like how Annette kept fit. I think it suits her great and I believe we can look amazing at any age if we take care of ourselves. Maybe Ernestine is too build up for my taste but I encourage you to become the person you envision yourself to be. It's important to feel good in your own skin.

 

By the way, I'm a vegetarian as well, since two years.(still eating dairy products... unfortunately I'm a cheese eating mouse) I'm trying to become vegan but I don't want to rush and not take into account my pshysiological needs. I would still like to eat fish from time to time. ( I especially need omega 3 fatty acids, but I know there are also supplements so maybe I could use only these) I've read about the deficit of vitamin B12. ( you'll laugh but I understood that often times there are more meat eaters that have this deficit than vegans) And if you don't want to take supplements (like I am thinking, maybe it's bad thinking), there are fortified foods, like cereals and others but I still need to read more about these.

 

If you want to talk more about this, I've also found a really good vegan blogger that is posting some kick-ass information about leading a healthy vegan lifestyle but it's in my native language and I'll have to translate the info and get back to you. :)

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Wooooow ! Amazing ! Thank you very much PauljustPaul and Gabi ;):)  for all the information.

It will be very helpful.

And now I know Carolinewaits is also vegan :)

 

Ok Gabi, it's quite funny we are both vegetarian and I didn't know...

 

 

Great ! Thank you for everything guys... And now, I know I can ask you if I need some more informations...

See you !

I

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Wooooow ! Amazing ! Thank you very much PauljustPaul and Gabi ;):)  for all the information.

It will be very helpful.

And now I know Carolinewaits is also vegan :)

 

Ok Gabi, it's quite funny we are both vegetarian and I didn't know...

 

 

Great ! Thank you for everything guys... And now, I know I can ask you if I need some more informations...

See you !

I

Yes, always learning something new about the people and world around us, huh?  You're much welcomed. It seems we're finding support here for more than we came for. ;) Looking forward to finding more shared topics to talk about!

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As a future nutritionist, just want to make sure you get your Vitamin B12 (as was already mentioned) and your calcium!  Cereals are fortified, yes, but if we need B12 and it comes strictly from meat, then were we meant to eat meat?  We don't need a lot to meet our needs.  Just a thought to ponder.  Plant-based diets have many, many benefits as well namely cancer-reducing benefits.

(Vitamin B12 deficiency can give a tingling in the feet, FYI)

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B-12 doesn't come strictly from meat. It comes from bacteria in the soil that nonhuman "farm animals" ingest as they consume the crops they do.  That's why they get it and we don't - we wash all our produce.
 

That's what I've learned, but I could be wrong. And physiologically, yes, we were meant to eat meat - if by that, we agree that we mean we have omnivorous digestive systems. But if we can get B-12 from cleaner sources, and ones that don't involve harming, exploiting, and/or killing innocents, why the heck not? :) I'd always rather be compassionate than eating tasty food. Eating tasty helps me. Being compassionate helps others.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvpePfC9hh8&index=6&list=PLmIqdlomtuStz4uRepEBw2w0SgWNPSWDV

 

And calcium is found plenty in green vegetables. We think of all these nutrients we can only get from other animals. But ask: HOW DO THESE ANIMALS GET THESE NUTRIENTS?! Any nutrients you're getting from eating other animals (I say "other" animals because we always forget WE are animals) are second-hand. Either you make it in your own body (like creatine), or get it from plants (protein, calcium, etc.). As do the animals we eat.

And, again, why not get nutrients from a better source?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ANCusVd_Kk

 

We're not carnivores, we're omnivores. But we can survive and thrive on a plant-based diet. We may be healthier, but more importantly, the planet, and the beautiful innocent creatures that live on it, will benefit from it.

Honestly, I love sharing all this, because everything changes as a vegan. Everyone is more important and special in your eyes, and you feel amazing (provided you have decent nutrition).

 

Something else that's important to really hit home is this: We can't bash the "vegan diet" (which is sort of a misnomer - veganism is an ethical philosophy; what we really mean is a plant-based diet, or strict vegetarian diet) as inherently unhealthy when most of us eat like crap anyways! It's hilarious to hear people saying that a plant-based diet has its limitations and ultimately isn't healthy when we all eat like garbage. If you meet a long-term vegan, chances are they are much healthier than someone who eats other animals.

This is my experience. I was expecting to feel really crappy as a vegan, but did it anyways - I wasn't going to have more blood on my hands. But once I became vegan, I did not need to take daily allergy medication anymore. My immune system is astonishingly better - if I get sick, it's very brief and mild, whereas I used to get sick a lot and stay that way for a long time.

And this is the case with many others, too.

And we can't use the "ex-Vegans" as examples. If you ask them about how they ate, they probably just stopped eating certain things, while not taking into account the nutrients they were missing by cutting out meat and how to replace them with plants.

You can be a (physically) healthy meat-eater, for sure. I'm not saying otherwise. But you'd be surprised how many people stick with veganism and show profound health improvements.

 

Last order of business: If you eat fish, you're not a vegetarian!!!! Fish is meat! It's flesh! If you eat fish, but no other animal-based meat, you eat a semi-vegetarian diet, technically. Vegetarians don't eat any animal flesh. Strict vegetarians eat only plants, no animal products whatsoever. Vegans are strict vegetarians who are motivated out of ethical principle to do so.

 

Done.

*mic drop*

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 If you eat fish, you're not a vegetarian!!!! Fish is meat! It's flesh! If you eat fish, but no other animal-based meat, you eat a semi-vegetarian diet, technically. Vegetarians don't eat any animal flesh. 

 

The term I see used for fish-eaters who consume no other animal meat is "pescatarian."  :D Most of my friends who were vegetarians in high school have ended up transitioning to pescatarianism for one reason or another. I also know some people who consume no mammalian products (such as pork, beef, and dairy) but who eat fish and poultry, and continue to eat eggs. It's interesting to see where different people draw their personal moral lines.

 

Personally, I have a very beef-and-dairy heavy diet, and don't see myself abstaining entirely any time soon. Lately I have been cutting back meat and adding in more fruits and veggies, but that's entirely for personal health reasons. And as part of cutting back meat, I've been eating way more eggs. So, I definitely won't be anything resembling a vegan any time soon.  :lol: I do find it interesting to read about though, and totally respect people who do chose veganism.  ^_^

 

BTW here are some vegan supplements that include B-12, and vegan omega-3 supplements, in case anyone is interested.

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As a future nutritionist, just want to make sure you get your Vitamin B12 (as was already mentioned) and your calcium! Cereals are fortified, yes, but if we need B12 and it comes strictly from meat, then were we meant to eat meat? We don't need a lot to meet our needs. Just a thought to ponder. Plant-based diets have many, many benefits as well namely cancer-reducing benefits.

(Vitamin B12 deficiency can give a tingling in the feet, FYI)

Someone does not have to eat meat to get B12 - I am a lacto-vegetarian since birth, and I don't remember experiencing it. Our family roots, as far as I can remember, are mostly vegetarians. Remember, there are Indians who inherit it this way, and have it inherited this way for thousands of years - there's no case of any deficiencies in them. Maybe they have adopted or evolved so, but sentiocentrism, more or less, is and has been a part of our culture for thousands of years. Veganism may not work with some people - an Austrian friend of me, went to hospital for it; he tried hard for something like years, though.

(Remember, Jains are lacto-vegetarians, they do not separate calves, they do not rape cows, they keep them as they are, let them roam and get just a little milk from them, what's left for them. That's where we inherited it from; it may be different in the west, but our local farming methods still forbid beef, so they are just mostly set free. They are increasingly changing because of new 'factories' which came to rise, here, with aims of getting highest amount of profit in a short time.)

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Someone does not have to eat meat to get B12 - I am a lacto-vegetarian since birth, and I don't remember experiencing it. Our family roots, as far as I can remember, are mostly vegetarians.

 

Yogurt and other dairy products can have a lot of B-12, so if your diet permits dairy that is probably where you are getting it from. The concern of B-12 deficiency is greatest for total vegans who consume no animal products.

 

Here's an article about B-12 and veganism from a vegan site.

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Yogurt and other dairy products can have a lot of B-12, so if your diet permits dairy that is probably where you are getting it from. The concern of B-12 deficiency is greatest for total vegans who consume no animal products.

Here's an article about B-12 and veganism from a vegan site.

Yes, I know. It is just the ethics behind vegetarianism as the way we practice(d) it. They can either grow their own cows, or, take suppliments, if it was driven by ethics. And moreover, a previous post mentioned something like 'we have to eat meat for B12', so I just said we don't have to.

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While I was searching online about going vegan, I came across what I think is the best video ever on this topic, that sums up the key reasons why people should consider going vegan. There are some things I knew, some things I didn't but they are surely things to take into consideration. I will share this with you(at the bottom of the message), because I really feel like I should share it, without trying to make any of you feel uncomfortable.(though I think feeling uncomfortable in this situation is not a bad thing)

 

There are so many benefits to this, for us, the animals and the whole world. And in my opinion, the speaker points out the importance of being consistent with your inherent compassionate self and not let yourself be dictated by society or fleeting personal pleasure. Most of us are, if not totally then partially, ignorant to the real world around us and there are many reasons why we are this way. But I think that once something has been revealed to us, we become completely responsible to act according to what we know. And once you make a decision, to give 100% and stick to it no matter the difficulty of the temptation.

 

So having said this, if anyone cares, I'm going vegan. Woo-hoo... And never going back. Wish me luck. :)

 

@PaulJustPaul: Yes, you're right.(but please stay calm  :)) Eating fish does not make you a vegetarian. I haven't been eating any kind of meat, just dairy. (so an ovo-lacto-vegetarian) But it so happened I just found out omega 3 is particularly important for me, so I kind of panicked and wrote that as it came into my mind. I should know better to edit my texts with patience next time as it's impossible for you or anyone to really understand otherwise. My bad.

 

So, here it is, THE video:

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gZG6oclJJnY

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And physiologically, yes, we were meant to eat meat - if by that, we agree that we mean we have omnivorous digestive systems. But if we can get B-12 from cleaner sources, and ones that don't involve harming, exploiting, and/or killing innocents, why the heck not? :) I'd always rather be compassionate than eating tasty food.

 

Hm, this actually raises two questions for me -- just so you know, I'm not trying to be confrontational or to change your mind on anything, I'm just curious to hear more about your personal moral philosophy. ^_^ I know a couple who keep a chicken in their backyard. The chicken is as well-cared for as any of their other pets. They now get their eggs exclusively from that chicken (and actually eat vegan the rest of the time). Since that kind of animal product consumption doesn't harm the animal in any way, would you eat eggs in that circumstance?

 

I also know vegans who make exceptions for honey and beeswax, because beekeepers only take excess honey the bees are not using. They actually see supporting that industry as being better for the bees and the planet at-large, what with the fact that honeybees have been dying off in alarming numbers lately. Again, I'm curious for your thoughts.  :)

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While I was searching online about going vegan, I came across what I think is the best video ever on this topic, that sums up the key reasons why people should consider going vegan. There are some things I knew, some things I didn't but they are surely things to take into consideration. I will share this with you(at the bottom of the message), because I really feel like I should share it, without trying to make any of you feel uncomfortable.(though I think feeling uncomfortable in this situation is not a bad thing)

 

There are so many benefits to this, for us, the animals and the whole world. And in my opinion, the speaker points out the importance of being consistent with your inherent compassionate self and not let yourself be dictated by society or fleeting personal pleasure. Most of us are, if not totally then partially, ignorant to the real world around us and there are many reasons why we are this way. But I think that once something has been revealed to us, we become completely responsible to act according to what we know. And once you make a decision, to give 100% and stick to it no matter the difficulty of the temptation.

 

So having said this, if anyone cares, I'm going vegan. Woo-hoo... And never going back. Wish me luck. :)

 

@PaulJustPaul: Yes, you're right.(but please stay calm  :)) Eating fish does not make you a vegetarian. I haven't been eating any kind of meat, just dairy. (so an ovo-lacto-vegetarian) But it so happened I just found out omega 3 is particularly important for me, so I kind of panicked and wrote that as it came into my mind. I should know better to edit my texts with patience next time as it's impossible for you or anyone to really understand otherwise. My bad.

 

So, here it is, THE video:

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gZG6oclJJnY

You summed it up so perfectly! I'm very excited for you! And I've been vegan for 3 years (not a long time, but long enough to know how to do it ;) ), so if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask me.

 

And just to be clear, I wasn't really upset about the pescetarian/vegetarian confusion. I just find it kind of funny when people call themselves vegetarians yet are not. But I also call vegetarianism either "weak sauce" or "veganism in training", so I like to make humour with a bitter taste to it.

 

When you say you're never going back... That's probably true. You seem like a sweet and compassionate person, with a great heart. So beware - once you go vegan for reasons other than simply your own physical health, you will find more and more reasons to do so. It just makes sense, and it is amazing. It is life-changing, for both yourself and everyone you impact.

 

My excitement for you is indescribable. Of course, don't put immense pressure on yourself. Let yourself BECOME vegan - do it gradually. That way, you'll allow yourself to get used to it more and more, and making it more likely that you will stick with it. Best of luck on your journey!

 

Hm, this actually raises two questions for me -- just so you know, I'm not trying to be confrontational or to change your mind on anything, I'm just curious to hear more about your personal moral philosophy. ^_^ I know a couple who keep a chicken in their backyard. The chicken is as well-cared for as any of their other pets. They now get their eggs exclusively from that chicken (and actually eat vegan the rest of the time). Since that kind of animal product consumption doesn't harm the animal in any way, would you eat eggs in that circumstance?

 

I also know vegans who make exceptions for honey and beeswax, because beekeepers only take excess honey the bees are not using. They actually see supporting that industry as being better for the bees and the planet at-large, what with the fact that honeybees have been dying off in alarming numbers lately. Again, I'm curious for your thoughts.  :)

Stead, don't worry, I know you well enough that you're never trying to be antagonistic. You're super curious and inquisitive, and I think it's amazing. There's a difference between asking question and trying to create a "GOTCHA!" scenario. I know the difference - I'd answer either way, but especially with you, always happy.

 

Both scenarios are interesting, and actually quite similar, dealing with the same principles, I believe. These animals are raised with "care", and then their products are extracted. On the surface, it sounds fine. But digging deeper, it's kind of f***ed.

 

Why would that couple have a chicken in their back yard? Was it a nonhuman refugee, who they have decided to protect and care for unconditionally? It doesn't really sound that way - it sounds like they "care" for the chicken, but have him/her there so they can take the chicken's eggs.

I ask: Why do the couple need to get something out of it? Is the satisfaction of caring for that beautiful creature not enough? When it comes to veganism, it is not simply the killing or brutal treatment that is of concern - it also comes down to exploitation. Is it right to exploit a sentient being? We would say it is not morally acceptable to exploit a HUMAN animal, but don't hold the same standards for treatment of nonhuman animals. And I've never heard a good reason for that distinction. We separate our species from every other species, really, simple because our species is our species. It sounds circular, and that's because it is. We view other species as inferior and not worth of freedom from exploitation simply because they are not our species, and do not share interests identical to ours. However, their interests, albeit perhaps simpler, are still their interests. They value their lives in the same way we do ours - one's life is all one has.

So while taking the egg may not physically or apparently harm the chicken, it is still disrespectful. We deny them the freedom of living their lives free of exploitation, the freedom we grant our fellow humans. It's an unfounded double standard, and that's why I find it immoral. If freedom of exploitation in humans is a moral right, and there is no good reason to MORALLY distinguish between our species and others (in terms of the value each of us are assigned), then there is no good reason to deny that right to freedom of exploitation to nonhuman animals.

That's it all in a nutshell. Of course, it's a little more complicated, but I have a feeling we'll continue discussing this. :)

 

With regards to the bees, that is interesting for sure. And much more complicated. I like to say I'm a deontologist in theory, but must be a utilitarian in practice.  It is wrong (albeit not immensely) for beekeepers to exploit these bees for their honey. And frankly, the dying rates of honey bees may be that they're used for honey production, and nearly all are killed in the process. But even if that is not the case, and their survival is improved by safe, non-lethal beekeeping, is it still morally wrong? Yes, for it is exploitation of a sentient being, denying them the ability to live their lives freely.

BUT... that does not mean supporting such an industry is morally wrong per se. It's an imperfect world, and our use of nonhumans, even this so called "humane" beekeeping, is ugly. But if it ensures the lives of these bees, and more bees in the future, as well as more animals overall in the future (including ourselves), it is the right thing then to support this industry? Maybe. We need to think of the end result. It probably would not ensure the lives of the bees currently being kept, but maybe the lives of future bees. It's not my position, but it can be a morally defensible one, for sure.

 

I think you're touching upon an interesting point, though. I'm a vegan, so I supposedly don't eat any animal products. I've been a vegan for 3 years. When the last time I ate animal products?

About a month ago.

:o

My mom, who's been trying to go more vegan (and probably will be vegan in a few years) made breaded zucchini fries, using up old store-bought Italian bread crumbs. I bet she did not know they had parmesan cheese in them. But I ate them. They were tasty, but I didn't like the idea I was eating cheese. The reason I ate them is not because I was "cheating", but because veganism is not about my own personal purity - it's about the animals. If I refused to eat them because of a bit of cheese in them, my mother, brother, and father would see veganism as difficult and picky, and be less interested. Now, my brother is going vegan, and my mom is inching her way there, and my dad is at least thinking more about it. And I credit that to my not freaking out about every little ingredient.

 

If I go to a restaurant and make a huge deal of only getting things that did not touch any animal products, only to find out it's impossible and leave, who would be more likely to think of the animals they eat? Probably no one. If I order the most vegan thing I can (like a veggie burger without cheese, but possibly with egg in the patty), I will make thinking of animals seem easier, and possibly inspire more people to stop eating animals.

 

Sometimes, refined white sugar is processed through charcoal made of bone marrow - sometimes, not always. But I don't concern myself with that anymore. If someone sees me eating a box of Oreos, and I tell them there is no meat, no eggs, and no milk (that "creme" is make of coconut and sugar), chances are veganism is going to seem much more appealing. I could say I don't want to support the use of animal bone charcoal, but if I do so, I'll probably make veganism more appealing, and more people will go vegan. Then, the use of animals in such a way as to filter sugar will probably cease in the future.

 

It's sacrificing purity. It's being okay with a bit of compromise, with the belief that it will ultimately create a vegan world more quickly. It's not a perfect world, so we can't be perfect. I'm 100% vegan, and I am imperfect. It's not about vegan points, or never touching something with animal products in it. It's about recognizing the value of all sentient beings, and striving to make this world a place where all are loved and respected.

 

This is an EXCELLENT video, that I think will make people better understand what veganism SHOULD be. I used to be one of those self-concerned, "Oh, but there's honey in it!" vegans. Now, I'm focused on the message I'm producing. It's not about me, it's about the innocents.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEAgfIWu6W0

 

This might have gotten convoluted, and I apologize. But PLEASE shoot any other questions towards me, whether they be new questions or requests for clarification. I'm more than happy to share this wonderful message to any that are curious.

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I'm vegan too  :superwaiter:

So, what I'm hearing is... you're AWESOME?!

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I'm vegan too :superwaiter:

Awesome! Ninja TinyDancer! :superwaiter:

I have different perspective on this; I do not endorse 'utilitarianism' in any way, because of my concern about the 'utility monster', a monster that is artificially made to suck all the utility on the utilitarians' arbitrarily defined utility. In such consequentialist point of view, it does not guarantee any form of sentient autonomy. I would voice for free will of the sentient beings.

I am more like a species-nondiscriminatory apply-their-own-moral-to-themselves positive-benefit-of-doubt person. This means that, I would kill the utilitarian and save five, if that person claimed that he was a utilitarian and unless claimed otherwise thereafter; I would automatically assume that they are still a supporter of it. You would not call me a denontologist right here.

We do not use eggs, and, we were not used to treat cows like machines. Cows roam here and there, even on the roads, and return if they want to - I do not see, if the cow does not object, anything wrong about taking a little amount of milk from it (after giving it to her calves). This is why I do not even eat cheese - I only get milk from some place we personally know. I don't think it is any way 'exploiting'. (Commodity status of sentient beings is still something unacceptable by many of our communities, and freedom to leave is one of their essential freedoms).

I am sentiocentric (the first rule). I do not see why arbitrary position of being born on another species should make some sentient being of other species suffer, for non-necessary causes. "The want to live" is where I draw the line; something that cannot 'want' anything cannot 'want' to live, as well (plants). And I would not want to deny any sentient which wants to live, just like I do, due to arbitrary measures (i.e. not relating to 'wants') like race, colour or species, for example. And to me, "conscience" is not the ability to process and make preferences from strictly old memories, like how some philosophers define it.

I also disagree that Kantianism is biased against other species because utilitarianism, on its old, original version, was still so. They just patch their ideas, then come and compare with others who were far more original, without giving them a chance to patch theirs as well. Good job.

@EllaGabrielle: Beautiful profile picture; I am glad that you changed out from plain old monochrome :)

Edit: My babies (who I just stole from Google) say hi to EllaGabrielle, Paul, Géraldine, Steadfast Madcup, TinyDancer and anyone who sees this :)

baby-pig-in-blanket.jpg

ej485-pigs-in-bed.jpg

And unfortunately, this guy thinks he'd rather eat the ice-cream first :o

65494f6622e039f9c61526eb730d5c72.jpg

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You summed it up so perfectly! I'm very excited for you! And I've been vegan for 3 years (not a long time, but long enough to know how to do it ;) ), so if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask me.

 

And just to be clear, I wasn't really upset about the pescetarian/vegetarian confusion. I just find it kind of funny when people call themselves vegetarians yet are not. But I also call vegetarianism either "weak sauce" or "veganism in training", so I like to make humour with a bitter taste to it.

 

When you say you're never going back... That's probably true. You seem like a sweet and compassionate person, with a great heart. So beware - once you go vegan for reasons other than simply your own physical health, you will find more and more reasons to do so. It just makes sense, and it is amazing. It is life-changing, for both yourself and everyone you impact.

 

My excitement for you is indescribable. Of course, don't put immense pressure on yourself. Let yourself BECOME vegan - do it gradually. That way, you'll allow yourself to get used to it more and more, and making it more likely that you will stick with it. Best of luck on your journey!

Thank you so much for your encouragement and advice! And your excitement is really strengthening my decision so thank you for that! And yes, I do understand what you mean ... a lot of folks like to rather pose in looking better than they are than actually trying to become that person. Nothing good comes easy but that's also an important part of what makes it good I think. (and I'm sure most of us here can identify with this last sentence)

Thank you also for your openness. I might ask you but I'm also a part detective(nerd) and I like to do my own research. Another thing is that we live in different countries (continents actually) so I need to adapt to what I have available here... but thank you very much, I'm sure with your experience you will be able to help me in need. ^_^

And least but not last, thank you for your kind words. You also seem like a thoughtful, compassionate person with a great heart and I don't think I'm mistaking. I know this community is full of precious people.

And nope, there's no going back for me. It would feel like I'm cheating on myself... so, life-chance come and get me, hehe. (or rather, ready or not, I'm coming after ya!)

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@EllaGabrielle: Beautiful profile picture; I am glad that you changed out from plain old monochrome :)

Edit: My babies (who I just stole from Google) say hi to EllaGabrielle, Paul, Géraldine, Steadfast Madcup, TinyDancer and anyone who sees this :)

 

 

Thank you, mewaiting! There was a personal reason why my picture was b&w but the original colored one is closer to reality and I like that. I'm glad you like it. :)

 

And hello cute, furry babies. ;) The last little fellow doesn't look so happy... I believe the ice-cream might not be vegan and he doesn't like that... nope, nope, nope.

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Thank you, mewaiting! There was a personal reason why my picture was b&w but the original colored one is closer to reality and I like that. I'm glad you like it. :)

And hello cute, furry babies. ;) The last little fellow doesn't look so happy... I believe the ice-cream might not be vegan and he doesn't like that... nope, nope, nope.

Hey Ellagabrielle,

My daughter (who I also stole from Google, it seems like I have millions of babies :o ) looking so serious at you, maybe she thinks you are very beautiful, like I do:

eeb3e482d9dd19eb30ea537487c253e8.jpg

Yes, I have to talk with that baby with ice-cream, maybe I have to give more apples to her.

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@mewaiting: Haha, your daughter is very sweet and also beautiful. Thank you for the compliment. ^_^  But at such compliments I can only feel humbled as I had nothing to do with this. And yes, apples are a great alternative!

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Hi,

 

I know this is a super late response, but I just HAD to say...I'm a vegan too! :) :) :)

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Hey everyone,

 

Just wanted to let you guys know about an AMAZING app that I found for vegans. It's called "Vegan Amino." It has been so helpful to me so far throughout my journey as a vegan. It's a great way to connect with like-minded individuals, and it is also a great way to find new, scrumptious vegan recipes!

 

You guys should really go check it out! You can find me on there as well. My username is Philosophermit :lol:.  

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I follow a low fat whole foods vegan diet similar to the one Dr. McDougall recommends. I eat this way for my health, nonviolence towards animals, and due to ecological concerns.

If for no other reason, go vegan because of vanity!

 

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