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Woman marries Jesus

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'My students asked if they should call me Mrs. Hayes when I come back to school next week, and no, I’m still Ms,' she said.

 

As a student I would not have wanted to know *anything* about my teacher's sex life, even if it was about her lack of sex-having. O_o

 

I guess I just don't see the point of having this sort of mid-point between being a normal Catholic person who happens to be a virgin, and becoming a full-fledged nun. Maybe someone could explain it...?

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As a student I would not have wanted to know *anything* about my teacher's sex life, even if it was about her lack of sex-having. O_o

 

I guess I just don't see the point of having this sort of mid-point between being a normal Catholic person who happens to be a virgin, and becoming a full-fledged nun. Maybe someone could explain it...?

The article stated that it's because if they become a nun, they must make vows of poverty and obedience, as well as live in a convent. By living as a "consecrated virgin," rather than a nun, they don't have to take those other vows or live in a convent.  

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The article stated that it's because if they become a nun, they must make vows of poverty and obedience, as well as live in a convent. By living as a "consecrated virgin," rather than a nun, they don't have to take those other vows or live in a convent.  

 

But I guess my point is I don't see why someone would only swear to remain a virgin forever without taking on the other vows, or at least, why it's necessary to have an entirely separate ceremony and special name for such a person. It seems like it places kind of an odd focus on her (lack of) sex life.

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I do admire her passion, but find it extremely frightening that so many adults can claim to have a loving relationship with somebody they have never met...

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I guess I just don't see the point of having this sort of mid-point between being a normal Catholic person who happens to be a virgin, and becoming a full-fledged nun. Maybe someone could explain it...?

 

But I guess my point is I don't see why someone would only swear to remain a virgin forever without taking on the other vows, or at least, why it's necessary to have an entirely separate ceremony and special name for such a person. It seems like it places kind of an odd focus on her (lack of) sex life.

 

The way I see it, I'm just "a normal Catholic person who happens to be a virgin". But I've not chosen to be a virgin forever. I'm just waiting around till I find a guy to marry. That's very different from deciding, "You know what, I'm not going to get married, and I'm instead going to dedicate my life to God entirely." There's a real commitment involved that isn't the case with someone who's just waiting till marriage (but might be a virgin their whole lives if they never actually get married).

 

It might make more sense to you if I point out something the article didn't mention, which is that you don't have to be a virgin in order to consecrate yourself to God. This article is referring specifically to the practice of consecrating your virginity, but if someone isn't a virgin, it's still possible to be a consecrated single. I don't know much about it, but I imagine it'd be pretty much the same ceremony, but would just remove the references to virginity. I recently met a women named Dawn Eden at a Catholic talk who's hoping to become a consecrated single woman in the Church, although she's not a virgin.

 

As someone mentioned, this is different to becoming a nun because you wouldn't be taking vows of poverty and obedience to a religious order, and wouldn't be living the typical "nun life" inside a convent. You'd just carry on living your life as you were before, in the community e.g. as a teacher, doctor, etc. Dawn is an author, journalist and public speaker, and that's what she's going to continue with if she's consecrated.

 

(Dawn Eden is really cool, by the way, and she's really nice. The book she's reading from is really good, too.)

 

 

xxx

 

EDIT:

 

Where is Jegsy when we need her?  :P

 

 

I was on my way to bed. It's really late, but thank goodness I checked up on the site, otherwise this question would have gone unanswered until my return.  :D

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It might make more sense to you if I point out something the article didn't mention, which is that you don't have to be a virgin in order to consecrate yourself to God. This article is referring specifically to the practice of consecrating your virginity, but if someone isn't a virgin, it's still possible to be a consecrated single. I don't know much about it, but I imagine it'd be pretty much the same ceremony, but would just remove the references to virginity.

 

That does make it seems a bit less odd to me, though I guess I still don't see the point in the ceremony and special label when, as you said, they're going to resume their lives in the community exactly as they'd been living before the ceremony. Ah well.  :lol:

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Why not. It seems pretty understandable to me that someone would want to consecrate their virginity to their God - the same thing happens in other religions too. I know a Hellenic polytheist (a friend of a friend) who swore her virginity to Artemis, for example. It doesn't seem strange at all that someone who is very devoted to their religion, and whose deity preaches or has a strong connection to virginity, would want to become a consecrated virgin.

 

As for becoming a nun, or part of a religious order, that requires a whole new level of commitment and I understand that some people just don't feel called to it. I guess consecrated virginity is like making a single, personal but important vow to a deity, but not going all the way and becoming part of their priesthood.

 

What I didn't like about the article was the way they presented it like it was weird and unusual. Of course, it's the Daily Mail and if they can sensationalise a story by titling it "Woman marries Jesus" rather than "Woman becomes consecrated virgin in the Catholic Church", they will. It felt like they were trying too hard to make a connection with the "Woman marries Eiffel Tower", "Woman marries Berlin Wall" etc stories.

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That does make it seems a bit less odd to me, though I guess I still don't see the point in the ceremony and special label when, as you said, they're going to resume their lives in the community exactly as they'd been living before the ceremony. Ah well.  :lol:

 

Eh, I guess it's the same as if you had two couples who had children and were living together, and one couple decided to get married while the other couple just made a private decision to stay together forever. Some people do make private vows of consecration, which I think Dawn's already done, but I guess it's more "real" to you if you've done it publicly. And it's inspiring to others, too, I suppose. Plus, it might make it easier for the person making the vow, since if it's public and the people in your parish can see it, then there'll be greater support for you than you might get otherwise.

 

Plus, it's a sign of how when you dedicate your life to God entirely, you are by extension dedicating your life to helping others around you. Like when nuns and monks take vows, they usually serve their community through charity work or teaching and so on. Even cloistered orders, you're spending a lot of time praying for others, and people often send prayer requests etc. to you. It's one of those interesting paradoxical thingies, I guess, where you're working for others even as you live alone.

 

As an aside, nuns do say that living with a bunch of other women helps you grow in holiness, just because it's so difficult to do and they get on each other's nerves sometimes. I remember a TV show about nuns where one of them told the interviewer, quite sincerely, "It's amazing to me that there hasn't been a murder yet."

 

What I didn't like about the article was the way they presented it like it was weird and unusual. Of course, it's the Daily Mail and if they can sensationalise a story by titling it "Woman marries Jesus" rather than "Woman becomes consecrated virgin in the Catholic Church", they will. It felt like they were trying too hard to make a connection with the "Woman marries Eiffel Tower", "Woman marries Berlin Wall" etc stories.

 

Ah, the Daily Mail...

 

xxx

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