Jasmine23

Male Doctors....

17 posts in this topic

Am I the only one that see a huge difference in male doctors and female doctors?

In my experience I've wanted to choke all but one of the female doctors I've ever had. And the one I liked was transferred to another state (jerks). The male doctors I've had have made me feel more at ease and they are more gentle and they do the job i as for and not the extra have you had this or you need to do that routine with me. Am I the only one that go through this?

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard from many women that, counterintuitively, they've always had way better luck with male gynecologists than with female ones.

 

I've had a female GP for the past 20-ish years who has always been great, but she's starting to head into retirement now, so I don't know what to do....  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I don't go to the gyne...... I've never been to one for myself just with my mom and sister. Every time my mom gets a female doctor she comes out wanting to slap her. Either her hand hurt or she has something negative to say about my mom and it never has anything to do with gyne talk or they are trying to give her a pill or surgery. And instead of giving straightforward answers, they beat around the bush. That's so annoying! (EDIT EDIT EDIT: NO PUN INTENDED SERIOUSLY LOL)

For me...I only go for regular checkups and blood testing or any other reason one my go to see a doctor and if I get a female.... it NEVER fails that I want to drag her through the patient waiting room by the glasses around her neck lol I have yet to have that problem with a male. Maybe because they are more gentle or they aren't as judgmental? And they get to the point and find the problem to whatever may be causing me trouble. I'm not sure but I stick with male doctor's because for some reason I trust them touching me than a woman.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a female doctor (GP), not that I go see her that often, but I've never had a problem with her and she is very good.  My mom also goes to see her quite a bit and I accompany her and she does a very nice job with trying to figure out exactly what is wrong and will send you to a specialist if needed.  

 

I had a male doctor up until college when I switched to this female doctor.  The reasons had nothing to do with his gender and I'm not even sure he still has his license.  

 

My current doctor is fairly young though so I hope she's around quite awhile.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I've had some negative experiences with female doctors. I'm NOT saying that all of them are like that, and I'm not doubting their ability because of their sex. (Obviously, I'm not sexist against my own.) I just feel that male doctors are a bit more cautious and gentler. Also, whenever a doc thought I was lying about not being sexually active, it has always been a female doctor who was very rude about it. If they doubt their patient's lifestyle that's fine, but there's no reason to be rude about it. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I've had some negative experiences with female doctors. I'm NOT saying that all of them are like that, and I'm not doubting their ability because of their sex. (Obviously, I'm not sexist against my own.) I just feel that male doctors are a bit more cautious and gentler. Also, whenever a doc thought I was lying about not being sexually active, it has always been a female doctor who was very rude about it. If they doubt their patient's lifestyle that's fine, but there's no reason to be rude about it.

That's another reason for me as well and they'd ask to give me a test I'd just look at them like they are crazy. I had one female doctor that was awesome. She was around my age and was in the same boat until marriage and then they transferred her. Now I'm stuck looking for a doctor and any appointments I make its male
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting I don't think either gender have been better or worse in my experience the last time I was at an appointment when I was asked if I was sexually active was my earlier teens so my answer being no wouldn't have been surprising but now I'm 22 I kinda hope the topic doesn't come up at the doctors I can only imagine their stunned response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though everyone is equal in person there are differences between male and female's behavior. Just like you guys say that male doctors are gentler in these situations, for me, the idea of having to tell something private or intimate to a female doctor feels way more comfortable than to tell it to a male doctor.

 

That's why I think that females are better psychologists, as much as girls believe that men are better doctors.

 

PS I never consulted a psychologist, I just told what does 'feel' more comfortable so I don't know if what I told is accurate. Feel free to prove me wrong.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never noticed a difference between male and female doctors. My regular gastroenterologists have all been male, although occasionally a woman filled in if I needed a last-minute appointment. The women were always just as great with me as the men, although obviously as subs I didn't know them as well.

 

My last two GPs were both women, and I LOVED them. Beau and I recently moved, so I need to find a new GP. I already have a new (male) gastroenterologist because I've been sick.

 

It's true that the only doctor I had who I didn't like was female, but she was also the only doctor I had who was a New Yorker. Her brashness was characteristic of some other New Yorkers I met, so I associate that with geographical differences, not gender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have different preferences depending on what specialty we're talking about.

 

For GP-type stuff, I couldn't care less whether I'm seeing a male or a female doctor. For OB/GYN, I feel like I prefer a male doctor, but then again, I've only had one experience with a male OB/GYN and he was just absolutely AWFUL... I like the woman I've seen since then, so I guess I really don't have a preference (the current practice I go to only has female doctors, so there wasn't any choice when I originally made the appointment). For sports med appointments and for massages, I always prefer male doctors. I actually specifically request male doctors for those types of things. But if I was going to go to a counseling appointment, I would never consider going to a male doctor. 

 

Wow. My preferences actually seem pretty based on gender stereotypes. Well, that's not good.

 

Anyways, I'll say that in my experience I've definitely wanted to throttle more female doctors than male doctors, but considering I've also seen more female doctors than male doctors, I imagine that's actually pretty proportional for me. My worst experience with a doctor was with a male doctor, but so was my best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate the Doctors full stop! I did my knee ligaments about 10 month ago, still haven't been!!

 

And I had a female doctor once who was wearing sandals who had clearly decided to never cut her toenails, honestly I did a ligament in my foot and she was telling me i'd be fine (after about 40 minutes running I'd get pain and for years after, so that was bollocks) but the state of her feet was so off putting! They were talons not nails :lol:

 

I would have thought having a male gyno was kind of horrible? I'd prefer a male doctor to look at my bits than a female one. Anyway..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have thought having a male gyno was kind of horrible? I'd prefer a male doctor to look at my bits than a female one. Anyway..

 

I know a number of women I've spoken with have agreed that the thought of having a female doctor in our bits is stranger than a male doctor. But some definitely prefer only female doctors. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This whole argument is the reason why I screen my doctors. I look into ratings and reviews so that whatever experience I have with my MD is as drama free as possible. I never understood why people don't look into these sorts of things. Why leave it to chance?

I'm also a straightforward, calm, and confident person. I extend the same courtesy towards my care providers that I expect to receive and I've rarely been disappointed. I'm also educated and don't come across and anything but sane and logical. You'd be surprised at what a difference this makes.

I've worked in 3 hospitals with a range of physicians and I can say the doctors can be either awesome, or not, purely separate from gender. As much as I hate to say it, you are a name and a medical history to most physicians until you build a rapport. And personality is not always a good indicator of skill in a physician.

As for having doctors doubt you when you reveal you're WTM, please don't be shocked. Just think about how many patients they get that have the "there's no chance of pregnancy" or "I've never touched a drug in my life" statements that are proven false with a single drug or pregnancy screen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This whole argument is the reason why I screen my doctors. I look into ratings and reviews so that whatever experience I have with my MD is as drama free as possible. I never understood why people don't look into these sorts of things. Why leave it to chance?

 

I screen my doctors as well, but those sites are often unreliable. See this case in Texas, where a neurologist was practicing so poorly that he killed multiple people while doing very simple outpatient procedures. His online ratings remained a 4.5/5 until his license was suspended. We also may not have many options due to our geographical location, our insurance policies, or because we had an emergency and simply had to go to the closest place and see the first person they had available.

 

I'm also a straightforward, calm, and confident person. I extend the same courtesy towards my care providers that I expect to receive and I've rarely been disappointed. I'm also educated and don't come across and anything but sane and logical. You'd be surprised at what a difference this makes.

 

That sounds like people who have bad experiences aren't educated, aren't logical, and are hysterical and rude. That simply isn't true. Doctors can screw up, and they do, all the time. Hospital errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States -- 440,000 every year. And that's only measuring fatalities, not, like in a case I had a few weeks ago, where I ended up in the ER due to an allergic reaction I had to some medicine that turned out to have been totally unnecessary to prescribe in the first place. Or like just a few days ago, where I found out I'd been walking around with multiple fractures for weeks without knowing it because two prior doctors didn't think it was necessary to give me an MRI.

 

As for having doctors doubt you when you reveal you're WTM, please don't be shocked. Just think about how many patients they get that have the "there's no chance of pregnancy" or "I've never touched a drug in my life" statements that are proven false with a single drug or pregnancy screen.

 

Speaking for myself, at least, I know that no matter how many times I tell them I'm not pregnant, they're still going to do a pregnancy test behind my back anyway. (Once when I was going in for an outpatient surgery, I saw a literal pile of negative pregnancy tests in the trash.) That's fine, I understand we live in a lawsuit-happy culture and they need to protect themselves. What irritates me is if they start berating me for my negatory answers. Just the other day before getting my MRI, I had to fill out a form that was pretty horrifically worded -- the box for 'my last menstrual cycle was 28 or more days ago' was the same box that said 'There's a chance I might be pregnant and need to delay the exam.' I did not appreciate the interrogation in the very public waiting area that followed me giving an honest answer. It made me wish I'd just lied, because I know that there is absolutely no chance that I might be pregnant. Being rude and doubting your patients is not a great way to get them to be honest with you.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I screen my doctors as well, but those sites are often unreliable. See this case in Texas, where a neurologist was practicing so poorly that he killed multiple people while doing very simple outpatient procedures. His online ratings remained a 4.5/5 until his license was suspended. We also may not have many options due to our geographical location, our insurance policies, or because we had an emergency and simply had to go to the closest place and see the first person they had available.

This is why I mentioned building a rapport and not judging your doctor based upon personality. Screening your doctor includes checking his/her past medical history which you can get a hold of including injury claims and malpractice. I didn't however, claim that your MD experience would be perfect if you took these precautions, just a tad more improved. My personal experience is that research saves me troubles a good majority of the time. If you're in an emergency situation where research isn't feasible, then you end up going with whatever options are available to you.

 

That sounds like people who have bad experiences aren't educated, aren't logical, and are hysterical and rude. That simply isn't true. Doctors can screw up, and they do, all the time. Hospital errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States -- 440,000 every year. And that's only measuring fatalities, not, like in a case I had a few weeks ago, where I ended up in the ER due to an allergic reaction I had to some medicine that turned out to have been totally unnecessary to prescribe in the first place. Or like just a few days ago, where I found out I'd been walking around with multiple fractures for weeks without knowing it because two prior doctors didn't think it was necessary to give me an MRI.

I think you misunderstood what I meant when I mentioned educated and logical. I mean reading up on my concerns, for example my history and issues that I'm bringing up to the doctors. I research whatever medications or procedures the docs want to do/prescribe and if I happen to disagree, I present my viewpoint to them with my research in hand. Although I've seen my share of confused and agitated patients, I don't happen to blame them because if they don't understand hospital jargon or procedure. Doctors aren't infallible and that is why I like being prepared and educating myself. It helps me to be more proactive in my medical care is essentially my point.

 

 

Speaking for myself, at least, I know that no matter how many times I tell them I'm not pregnant, they're still going to do a pregnancy test behind my back anyway. (Once when I was going in for an outpatient surgery, I saw a literal pile of negative pregnancy tests in the trash.) That's fine, I understand we live in a lawsuit-happy culture and they need to protect themselves. What irritates me is if they start berating me for my negatory answers. Just the other day before getting my MRI, I had to fill out a form that was pretty horrifically worded -- the box for 'my last menstrual cycle was 28 or more days ago' was the same box that said 'There's a chance I might be pregnant and need to delay the exam.' I did not appreciate the interrogation in the very public waiting area that followed me giving an honest answer. It made me wish I'd just lied, because I know that there is absolutely no chance that I might be pregnant. Being rude and doubting your patients is not a great way to get them to be honest with you.

This is where standard procedure comes into play. Again, there are medical standards that have to be adhered to. When I went to the ER recently, I also had a pregnancy test even though I had stated specifically that there wasn't a chance. But, because a CT scan was ordered, I was told to pee in a cup. I wasn't offended in any way and I didn't take it personally. I've been on the other side of the table where a critical test, like a CT scan, was delayed because the pregnancy test was wasn't done. Every woman within childbearing years is almost always automatically tested. It's a standing order.

I tend to be pragmatic and somewhat results based in my thoughts towards the medical field. I try to minimize my bad experiences by being proactive. I treat everyone with respect and expect the same back. If I have a bad experience, I make sure it is documented, and hope to save another patient from other bad experiences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had both male and female doctors. My one male doctor was super nice and gentle, made me feel comfortable and even plan sure he use extra lube for the duck. He was blessed to get a higher paying job and left the state. 😒 Then I got another guy doctor, rude jerk, he looked at me like I was crazy when I said I was still a virgin, and my concerns which him being down there was "ur a big girl, you had it done before, ur fine. Obviously the words ouch and that hurts doesn't matter to him. He made cry, and bleed. That was the one last time he touch me. My current doctor is a women, and I love her, like my 1st doctor she is very caring and understanding. She actually waited until engagement with her current husband so she understands and even take extra measures to make sure I am ok. I have learnt guy or girl if u are an inconsiderate jerk to me, your not touching me and definitely not coming near me that that damn duck!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now