ArtsyGal

Gamer Guys, Hot or Not??

46 posts in this topic

I'd say yes, but with limitations. I love video games myself, but also love reading and writing and have other interests beyond that. If a guy is obsessed to the point that he literally does nothing but eat, sleep and game, it's a bi of a turn off because conversation topics are always so limited. 

 

But a guy who knows the latest titles and what's new in gaming and likes to talk about them and try out different things in his free time would definitely get a thumbs up from me! :D 

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Ehhh . . . I game casually, mostly on devices like Kindle or ds. It wouldn't bother me if he just, you know, liked gaming. But I do find it to be a turnoff when a guy identifies as a Gamer. I've had too many male friends who were gamers and were very immature, and frankly, I think a lot of the most popular games are just gratuitous and gross (GTA, for example). My best friend is an avid gamer. It's, like, all he does. Which is his business, but sometimes I have to kind of hold myself back from eyerolling all over the the place when he tells me about the drama going on in his guild. Some people take it waaaaaaaaay too seriously, and it seems like online gaming is the place guys go to stay 13-years-old forever.

 

Turnoff for me.

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Ehhh . . . I game casually, mostly on devices like Kindle or ds. It wouldn't bother me if he just, you know, liked gaming. But I do find it to be a turnoff when a guy identifies as a Gamer. I've had too many male friends who were gamers and were very immature, and frankly, I think a lot of the most popular games are just gratuitous and gross (GTA, for example). My best friend is an avid gamer. It's, like, all he does. Which is his business, but sometimes I have to kind of hold myself back from eyerolling all over the the place when he tells me about the drama going on in his guild. Some people take it waaaaaaaaay too seriously, and it seems like online gaming is the place guys go to stay 13-years-old forever.

 

Turnoff for me.

 

dat srs bsnss

 

XD

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My boyfriend plays video games. I don't play any, except the wii on occasion with the family. He also hasn't picked up knitting. I don't give it much thought (hot or not), it just is what it is.

We both play board and card games, which is definitely important to me.

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Ladies, contain your orgasms, please:

 

video-gamer.jpeg

 

(I'm not a hater btw, I've watched him before and enjoyed his videos xD he's cool)

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I love playing video games every now and then myself (I used to play them like 24/7 haha), so I love it when a guy is into them too. I of course have to find him attractive to begin with... and then that's just a bonus :D It's nice having similar hobbies to bond over.

I have to add though, I met a "gamer" dude last year and developed a mini-crush on him because his apartment was FULL of nintendo amazingness... that crush died quickly once he turned out to be immature and rudely sarcastic. Man I wish I had a key to that apartment.... lol.

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Monopoly is fun because you can rob your friends and watch the happiness drain from them as their cash fills your wallet... :D

 

Whenever my family plays board games it gets super intense and usually at least one person walks away insulted lol. Especially if my older brother is playing. He's ummm *ahem* competitive. I brought my super fancy Zelda monopoly to Thanksgiving last year.... never again. 

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Hello ladies :D

 

Do you find men who play video games hot or not?

They can be casual gamers or hardcore.

What do you ladies think, date him or run away??

 

Run forest, ruuun!  :)) haha ... sorry but not sorry. Unfortunately I have met a lot of men (family included) that are casual/hardcore gamers (don't really know where the line is set) that are using games as a means of escaping reality and responsibility and that is not attractive, at. all. I prefer a person that finds reality-inclusive outlets for unwinding or relaxing - I think it's much more constructive for them. With this said, I used to play a lot of video games in childhood. But I was a child, I didn't really know what real life meant at that time, and if I could I would turn back time to use it more wisely and explore the real world and my passions more.

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Run forest, ruuun!   :)) haha ... sorry but not sorry. Unfortunately I have met a lot of men (family included) that are casual/hardcore gamers (don't really know where the line is set) that are using games as a means of escaping reality and responsibility and that is not attractive, at. all. I prefer a person that finds reality-inclusive outlets for unwinding or relaxing - I think it's much more constructive for them. With this said, I used to play a lot of video games in childhood. But I was a child, I didn't really know what real life meant at that time, and if I could I would turn back time to use it more wisely and explore the real world and my passions more.

 

I'm curious as to what you would classify as a "reality-inclusive" outlet. Would you find it unattractive if a man reads books? What if he watches TV or movies? Writes? Goes off fishing for a few hours? ...I'm just having trouble thinking of ways people unwind and relax that aren't escapes from reality.

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I'm curious as to what you would classify as a "reality-inclusive" outlet. Would you find it unattractive if a man reads books? What if he watches TV or movies? Writes? Goes off fishing for a few hours? ...I'm just having trouble thinking of ways people unwind and relax that aren't escapes from reality.

I think it's a difference of subjective perception here. You're right. I think what I was referring to more is the level of involvement and personal contribution more than simply reacting to stimuli. Films are in that way the same, if not even more so. Escaping reality is necessary  for our overal health but as I've felt and seen around me, video games can be a means not only of escaping reality but of escaping oneself. I base what I said on my personal experience and people I've met who didn't set healthy boundaries for themselves.With this said,  that doesn't mean video games are bad in themselves. (even if I have a personal reticence) Anything can be both used for good and bad and it's up to us to have discernment. Sorry If I've offended you somehow, that wasn't my intention.

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I think it's a difference of subjective perception here. You're right. I think what I was referring to more is the level of involvement and personal contribution more than simply reacting to stimuli. Films are in that way the same, if not even more so. Escaping reality is necessary  for our overal health but as I've felt and seen around me, video games can be a means not only of escaping reality but of escaping oneself. I base what I said on my personal experience and people I've met who didn't set healthy boundaries for themselves.With this said,  that doesn't mean video games are bad in themselves. (even if I have a personal reticence) Anything can be both used for good and bad and it's up to us to have discernment. Sorry If I've offended you somehow, that wasn't my intention.

 

Oh no, don't worry! You haven't offended me! 

 

Honestly, I was just curious what definitions you were operating under -- and on that matter, thank you for the elaboration.  :)  But yeah, I can definitely understand your whole 'boundaries' point, and of course, you're entitled to your own opinions on video games. I feel as though you may have had a somewhat skewed experience with guys who were into gaming, but hey, I'm sure there are plenty of guys who share your distaste of games. Like I said, I really was just curious how the whole escaping reality thing reconciled in your mind. I guess I've just had different experiences, is all.

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Oh no, don't worry! You haven't offended me! 

 

Honestly, I was just curious what definitions you were operating under -- and on that matter, thank you for the elaboration.  :)  But yeah, I can definitely understand your whole 'boundaries' point, and of course, you're entitled to your own opinions on video games. I feel as though you may have had a somewhat skewed experience with guys who were into gaming, but hey, I'm sure there are plenty of guys who share your distaste of games. Like I said, I really was just curious how the whole escaping reality thing reconciled in your mind. I guess I've just had different experiences, is all.

Ok, cool ! ^_^  Yes, I totally agree. Our personal experiences tend to speak most.

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I don't usually let minor hobbies like that interfere with my opinions on a guy. There is much more to them than just their gaming hobby..like their personality, ect. I am much more concerned if he doesn't want to further his life then if he wants to play a game after work or something lol

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I think it's cool.  It''s super fun and I personally love gaming, so it would be something we have in common.  But I wouldn't like it if all he did was stay indoors and play video games day and night.  So as long as the video games didn't take over his life i would think its pretty attractive, especially if he has a steam account ^.^ PC all the way

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Honestly, a guy who takes video games or card games at all seriously is a turn off to me. I guess I feel like it's more immature than less competitive hobbies like reading or hiking or watching sports (even though I hate sports) because by playing video games he’s directly expending his time, energy and money on contests over something that confers no practical benefit to him even if he wins except a chemical rush and meaningless sense of accomplishment. I suppose I feel like male competitiveness should be reserved for his career and other things with serious real life consequences while hobbies should just be purely about relaxing and having fun without being concerned about winning or losing.

 

If gaming is not your thing, that's fine. But the rest of your post is pretty ignorant. There are many video games out there that are not competitive by design, but even if they were, so what? Who are you to dictate why and how people enjoy doing with their leisure time? A hobby is any activity that brings personal fulfillment. Some people it's sports, others it's making crafts and others like video games. Just because you don't like it doesn't mean people are immature or wrong if they do. That is incredibly narrowminded.

 

Society seems to have this false view that video games are childish and have no value. The fact is that a few years ago, video games became legally recognized as a legitimate form of art by the US Supreme Court. They contain all the traditional elements that are associated with art such as graphic art, composed music and story telling. I argue it is the most immersive art form. You can't hear music or see the events of books but with video games you can. With film, you can see and hear it, but with video games you can see, hear AND control it. There are so many titles out there that would give a AAA Hollywood movie a run for it's money in production value, soundtrack and ability to evoke strong emotions.

 

And to say that video games have no practical purpose is simply wrong. They have shown to have many positive effects such as increased visual awareness, improved hand-eye coordination, treat dyslexia, relieve stress, slow down mental-decline in seniors etc.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/07/video-games-good-for-us_n_4164723.html

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freedom-learn/201502/cognitive-benefits-playing-video-games

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I think what it really comes down to (as I think you suggested) is that I associate gaming with low-status men -- losers, geeks, nerds.

 

Since when are geeks and nerds "low-status?" Some of the best people I know, women and men alike, are geeks and nerds. It's fine if you aren't interested in pursuing someone like that in a romantic relationship, but that doesn't make it OK to demean them by calling them lesser and lumping them in with losers. Also...chess is about the nerdiest possible hobby to have, so I'm not exactly getting how it's less "loser-esque" in your mind.

 

I do think it's healthy to have hobbies where you actively create or do, rather than just consume, but none of us can be that way all the time. I don't think there are many people who don't come home after a long day at work and watch Netflix, listen to music, read a book...or play a video game. Like Vince said, it's fine if it's not your thing. But it doesn't make sense to me to look down on people who choose to unwind with video games versus any of the other methods I listed.

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Hi, I saw this and I just thought I'd make some points where I saw some contradictions to reality. Nothing against you, I understand that you've likely not followed gaming culture very closely and probably only have reference to competitive gamers. I've spent chunks of my life where I did and didn't play games, and I can tell you that the biggest problem with it, is that it can be very addicting, as with any entertainment from books, to television, online gambling and even partying. Let's have a look: 
 

I guess I feel like it's more immature

Not necessarily. The idea that video games and animation are solely for children is leaving the main stream, though still held by people like comedian Jimmy Fallon who recently implied that gaming is for kids. Some incredibly successful and focussed people play video games, like Ed Sheeran who is famous for his determination and grit while working his way into the music industry, or Robin Williams' who took his acting and comedy incredibly seriously and was a passionate scholar. In fact, his daughter was named after the princess in The Legend of Zelda. Though many people would probably assume he was immature, upon first observations of course.
 

less competitive hobbies like reading or hiking or watching sports (even though I hate sports) 

Gaming isn't necessarily competitive, though the competitive side of it gets a lot of attention due to the amount of money invested in it. Some people really enjoy just casually following an awesome story or playing around with a fun gaming engine. Personally, I've always said that a good game is much like a good book, and that's especially true of one/two player games where you can go at your own pace and absorb the virtual "world" around you. Of course, that isn't to take away from the competitive players, and the millions they win in prize money at "e-sports" competitions each year, or those who enjoy watching them.
 

by playing video games he’s directly expending his time, energy and money on contests over something that confers no practical benefit to him even if he wins except a chemical rush and meaningless sense of accomplishment.

I'd say it's much like expending time watching a movie or a game of darts. But gamers can certainly practical benefits; the main writer of Clean Bandit was inspired by the Sega Game Gear, and video game music. Millions of mainstream music producers use chiptune-inspired synths. Wreck-It Ralph was inspired by video games. And some people simply enjoy the game without realising they benefit from training their problem-solving skills or reflexes.

Also, gamers usually feel these accomplishments make for great memories, especially with friends. That's if you even have to accomplish anything to have fun. I remember the first time I tried the sheep-gun in Ratchet and Clank 2; I turned an enemy into a sheep, and me and my cousin kept it as a pet and named it Sheepy. I took out a sniper rifle to zoom in on Sheepy so I could see its face, but I couldn't zoom in. I asked my cousin how to zoom, and he said "R1" - POOF. All that was left of Sheepy was woolly dust. Turned out "R1" was the alternate fire button. There was a pause and then I screamed "SHEEEPY" and everyone burst out laughing, it was sad and amazing at the same time. We will forever remember Sheepy.

 

I suppose I feel like male competitiveness should be reserved for his career and other things with serious real life consequences

 

I suppose my cousin should've reserved her female competitiveness for her career as well instead of playing Crash Bandicoot, but then, she played several years less of it than I did, and she never made it to University, whereas I did. I'd be interested to see some studies on whether video gaming affects career prospects, and in what way.

But I do think this is a good point; careers and responsibilities should take priority over a hobby, even if the two are linked. However, everyone needs time to relax or they get burnt out and stressed, which leads me to this:
 

while hobbies should just be purely about relaxing and having fun without being concerned about winning or losing.

 

What is relaxing is generally a subjective view, and while competitive gaming, much like rock-climbing, is often not considered very relaxing, some people spend their chill time just sailing the seas in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker or jumping from building to building in Mirror's Edge or building a commercially-themed mural in a Minecraft server to sell to a company, rather than putting together a boat out of matchsticks or reading 50 Shades of Grey.

Overall, I do think jogging is a healthier hobby and learning a language is currently more useful, and gaming can be addictive, but overall when played in moderation, it becomes like any other moderated hobby in our daily schedules. I know I probably sound incredibly nerdy to you xD but if you ever wanted to know more about gaming, and how it helps people and the careers surrounding it or leading from it, I'd be happy to talk to you about it, and (hopefully if I can remember them all) provide you with some resources or studies.

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