Steadfast Madcap

What kind of school do you want to send your future kids to?

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Thought this would be an interesting question to ask. :) At least in major US cities, there are so many possibilities: neighborhood public schools, magnet public schools, Catholic schools, protestant schools, exclusive prep schools, alternative-learning schools (such as Montessori and Waldorf), home-schooling co-ops, and so on....

 

Personally, I had a really negative experience in public school as a kid, so if I can possibly financially swing it, I really want to send my future kids to a private Montessori school. If I can't do that, I may consider homeschooling, but if my kids end up anything like my boyfriend and myself they will naturally be predisposed to shyness and social anxiety, so I'd prefer to send them out of the home for school so that they can achieve optimum socialization.

 

 

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I had a bad experience during childhood while attending public school too. For many years, I believed I wanted to homeschool my children if I ever have any, but you bring up a good point and it's been on my mind too. Shyness and anxiety (which I have) are both my concerns and I can only pray my kids won't have it too, because it really made life hard sometimes. That is exactly why I think I'd send them to a well trusted private school with a good reputation as well. I'd hope I can afford it by then, because if I'm not in a good place financially by then having kids will be out of the question.Then there's also the issue of potential bullies and whatever else, but I think if you raise them right and do your best you can at least trust theme enough to tell you about things like that, so you can solve the issue fast (by talking to teachers and the children's parents, etc.). Sorry, I tend to go off topic sometimes. Anyway, a trusted private school would be my choice. 

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A good public school, like the one I went to, the one that is making college seem easy. Private can expose them to the bitchy/snotty attitude of many priveledged, and homeschooling I believe is one of the worst things to do, all the social issues that come out of it.

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A good public school. Private can expose them to the bitchy/snotty attitude of many privileged

 

Hm, interesting; I actually had the opposite experience. I started off in a public school district that is considered highly desirable, so much so that my parents actually chose the neighborhood we moved to so that I would be zoned to those schools. Not only were the schools really bad (I shudder to think what the 'bad' public schools are like), but, because the school pulled from a really wealthy area of the city, the school was composed entirely of rich, white, Christian kids. When I transferred to my private Montessori school, I met people from all sorts of different ethnic backgrounds and faiths, and, while no one was exactly poor, I knew many people whose parents were really struggling financially to send their kids to that school.

 

Depends on where you live and the schools you have to chose from, I guess. There are private schools in my city that only the ultra-rich and snobby attend, and there are others that attract middle-class people who do very poorly in the public school system. But my state pretty much uniformly has really terrible public schools, so even the 'good' public schools are bad. Whereas in places such as New England, I hear that the public schools are so good that even the 'mediocre' schools are excellent.

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It really just all depends on personal experience and where you are in the country. In my New York State HS there were the very rich, to the very poor, and people covering every ethnic background imaginable. But, all the private schools in the area were primarily full of white snobby kids who were not pleasant to be around.

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Public school or Catholic school either one, I have no problem,even though  the latter can mean $20k+ in annual fees which is just too much.

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I went to a Catholic state school (here in the UK, religious schools can be state-funded). It was nice enough - great teachers, great academic achievement - but I have to say that I found the religious education aspect pretty average. Since I intend to be really involved with my children's religious education and not just leave it to the school, that's probably not too much of an issue.

 

But, that being said, I'd consider a private school if I could afford it and thought it would be beneficial. At the end of the day, my biggest concern would be the school's record of academic achievement, teaching style, environment, etc. I don't believe that schools, even Catholic schools, should be the primary religious educators, just supplementary. Parents can't leave it all to them.

 

EDIT: Oh, I forgot about homeschooling. It's not really very common in the UK, although it's legal. I don't think I would do that. If for whatever reason I thought I had to, I think I'd need to get a tutor. I wouldn't trust myself to teach anything beyond reading, writing and music (and even then, I don't think I'd be very good).

 

xxx

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Ideally private when they are young but when they get older, I would like to give them the option of Private, Public, if it is a good school, or Military. Keep in mind military schools have changed a lot in recent years.

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I would love for my children to attend a private school (known as public school in the UK). The class sizes are smaller so children can participate in lessons more readily, the facilities for sports/drama/music are amazing, and they invariably help children achieve the highest academic results.

I know I'm going to get absolutely slated for this next statement, but I would seriously consider sending my children to boarding school. I attended such a school (as did my mum and grandmother before me) and I honestly absolutely loved it. Obviously it depends on the personality of the child - I would be reluctant to send a child that was anxious and shy to boarding school as they could have a hard time adapting to being away from home. I would talk about school choices with my child (most boarding schools start at 11/13, although some prep schools take students from the age of 8 which I think is far too young to be away from home), and visit day and boarding schools with them, allowing them to make the ultimate decision.

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Some people are so ignorant.

What a lovely and constructive statement to make, dearie.

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I know I'm going to get absolutely slated for this next statement, but I would seriously consider sending my children to boarding school. I attended such a school (as did my mum and grandmother before me) and I honestly absolutely loved it. Obviously it depends on the personality of the child - I would be reluctant to send a child that was anxious amd shy to boarding school as they could have a hard time adapting to being away from home. I would talk about school choices with my child (most boarding schools start at 11/13, although some prep schools take students from the age of 8 which I think is far too young to be away from home), and visit day and boarding schools with them, allowing them to make the ultimate decision.

 

Nothing wrong with sending your kid to boarding school, as long as you take their personality and desire into the equation.  :) It's interesting that boarding school starts so young in the UK -- in the US, it's really difficult to find a boarding school below the high school (14-18) level. Boarding schools here tend to have a bit of an elitist image about them, but if my kid was interested in attending, I'd support them in that process completely. I think it'd be really cool if they got into a school like Exeter or Andover...but only if they got a ton of financial aid.  :lol:

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Public school, hopefully one close to where ever we live. If I can afford it I would send them to a private school. I remember wanting to go to one but it probably would have cost the same amount I pay for tuition for college. I went to a public catholic school ( I'm not catholic) where I had an amazing experience. If my children turn out anything like me a school with a small amount of students would be good.

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What a lovely and constructive statement to make, dearie.

Jasmine not dearie and thank you

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I'm homeschooling them and putting them in Christian study programs. They will learn the fundamentals of life and how to handle certain things in life rather it be drinking, smoking, sex, or even marriage the way I was. Military school sounds quite appealing but not sure. I was home schooled and was allowed to go out and socialize with others home schooled and those that had other schooling. I even went to different function of non home schooled kids. Home schooled children tend to be more modest in my opinion but i do know some none home schooled kids and people that are a bit modest as well. I don't mean modest in dress i mean in speech and attitude. I was then sent to public school and my school was and still is one of the top rated schools in America but I still saw horrible things. As secular as we were I saw lots of "upperclass" and "lowerclass" snobs but those that were in my group of homeschooling meets public were more easygoing, respectful, and out of trouble. I'm not saying all are like that. The fact is it's whose teaching you and how they are teaching you. It's who you were raised by and how you were raised.

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Claiming homeschooling teaches you how to act as they make indirect insults #wat

Please, do explain.

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Well I don't want kids. I've been to public, private, and homeschooled. I hated homeschooling. My parents forced homeschooling on my siblings and I.I wanted to be in a regular classroom with kids of all backgrounds. My public and private schools were awesome. If I did have kids I would try to send them to the local public school if it's good. I do like private schools. They have really small class sizes and teacher/student ratios. I always wanted to attend boarding school. It sounds like college except it's for kids. It really all depends on what I'm looking for in a school.

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Ideally private when they are young but when they get older, I would like to give them the option of Private, Public, if it is a good school, or Military. Keep in mind military schools have changed a lot in recent years.

I wouldn't even survive the first day here

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I wouldn't even survive the first day here

 

Haha, yeah, I would not have done well at military school. I don't know anyone who went to military school at the high school level, but I do have a friend who went to Texas A&M for undergrad. Though it's not exclusively a military school, it is classified as a senior military college, and it has a large Corps of Cadets that is a big part of life on campus. Not my thing at all, but it seems that the people who go there are very happy with it. To each their own.  :D

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This is a very interesting topic. It's funny how there are such strong opinions for opposing answers, but citing the exact same reasons. :-) it really does show how strong the influence of geographical [and thus demographical] location and one's own upbringing/personal experiences are for something like this. Very cool.

I guess the bottom line is, whatever the answer is, it needs to be well considered. ^_^

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Home-school would be my preference.  From what I've seen it has the potential to turn out self-motivated, intelligent, hard-working types.

 

I think the so-called social drawbacks are exaggerated.  Many of the early home school types were out of necessity and were often either remotely located or moved around so much that they would have had social challenges anyway.  And a certain percentage of people just are socially challenged, public/state school is probably not going to change that, but only make it worse anyway.

 

It isn't that hard to home school children once they get used to figuring more things out for themselves, and with the reference material available on the Internet now and the range of home school support groups around, I don't really see the down side.

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