Sophie

Voting?

19 posts in this topic

I'm assuming the vast majority of members here live in a democratic society and therefore have the right to vote (if you're of age.) I am 19, and there is going to be a Provincial election for British Columbia on the 14th. I have never voted before, but what I do understand is that there is no win-win situation. Like the Conservatives, Liberals, and NDP's provincially are all really bad choices, and the Green Party has a zero chance of winning or even getting third place. I feel like, provincially, all three are bad choices either for the environment, or for the economy. So why bother voting? On the other hand, I should probably exercise my right to vote and vote for the government that I feel will do the least amount of harm. Ugh, there are just no good choices.

 

Does anyone have any advice? What would you do in a situation like this?

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Go online and do research, people don’t do research, they just listen to what they hear on the radio or TV, and then go DURR and vote. I personally hate voting, but I do it (I despise politicians,) but you really do have to do research on the parties and candidates. It doesn't matter where you live, be an informed voter and not a “useful idiot.†(I’m not saying you are, but most people are) 

 

I a situation where you hate everyone, vote for what you think is the "least evil." You could always write in Darth Vader on the ballot. 

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EWZ, are there are any solid sources in which you gain information on candidates?

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Go online and do research, people don’t do research, they just listen to what they hear on the radio or TV, and then go DURR and vote. I personally hate voting, but I do it (I despise politicians,) but you really do have to do research on the parties and candidates. It doesn't matter where you live, be an informed voter and not a “useful idiot.†(I’m not saying you are, but most people are) 

 

I a situation where you hate everyone, vote for what you think is the "least evil." You could always write in Darth Vader on the ballot. 

 

Very well said! Doing your research is definitely important, since you get a better grip on what the person truly stands for. I'm not sure how it is in Canada, but in America there are tons of ads on TV bashing the other candidates. You never know how a candidate actually feels about an issue. You only know how much dirt they dug up on their opponent, yet you're not sure how truthful it is. Sadly, I often do end up voting for "the lesser of two evils" but I think it's very important to vote- especially as a woman.

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Well Sophie, since I am an American I can really only relate this to my own experiences and opinions about voting (which is practically in my DNA); hope you can dervive something of use from it. However I am hesistant to respond since politics are always a very touchy subject for people much like religion; so bear in mind that these are my opinions and I encourage you to make your own.

 

  Look when I am asked about my political views which I often am due to the nature of my work; I am required by law to not respond or make any statement on behalf of any political party. This is frustrating since I tend have an opinion on most political manners. But what I have come to say is 'I'm a patriot' and if someone inquires further about my voting tendencies I just turn them down and say 'Either side that better serves the needs of the country.' So without stating a side I really was able to state exactly how I feel about voting and politics.

 

    The truth is you will never if ever be perfectly aligned in agreement with one party or one candidate because none of it is black and white it is really a messy haze of grey. This is true for my views and opinions which rarely align with the majority and thus usually won't fit one candidate or even one party. However I still believe in the fundamental power of the right to vote and express your opinions however you see fit. So for me that places my vote with whom and with what party I feel (for the most part) will best help the country. However patriotism is my greater ideal yours maybe your future, your job, or your family, etc. But I of course encourage you fully to use the power of your voice to make a change and vote even if your view doesn’t pair up. Sometimes it is about picking a 'lesser of two evils' or perhaps not picking one at all; again its all a choice. (Brightside if your choice doesn’t make it at least you can say you spoke up and voted against rather than sitting back and staying silent)

 

   Bottom line for me: Speak Up and Speak Out. Don't be silent. If you have the right to make your voice (regardless of what you say) heard don't not let it be heard. So whatever you choose to say at least have a say by VOTING.

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Ill be able to vote in a year and a half! Death to the other party.

If you do not vote by choice, you cannot complain about politics!

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Another way I also decide to vote is to determine who is best for the position as a whole. I have ended up voting for candidates that may not be as aligned with my political views because I think they are better for the state/country/county at the time. Just another way of looking at it.

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Part of the problem with having a third party option (at least in the US) is that no one votes for the third party to begin with.  It's frustrating because this bipartisan thing really has to go, and quite a few Americans will agree with that.  Now the real issue is that they're so focused on not wanting the Republicans/Democrats to gain office that they view a vote on a third party as a lost vote.  This is so very not true.  All a third party requires to get federal funding of $20,000,000 for the next election cycle is to gain 5% of the popular vote.  In other words, if you really want to see the bipartisan system gone, you have to use your vote to change it.  Personally, I'm a Libertarian, and I'd love to see them get that 5%, but I'd also be happy to see any of the other third parties gain it just to show America that our vote really does matter, and we do have a voice to use that can change our gov't.  Once we see how easy it is to get the third party in, then it's just a matter of cycles until we really get a choice and not just the lesser of two evils.

 

As I said, this is only regarding elections in the US.  I've heard about the Canadian political system and find it to be very interesting, but sadly don't really know enough about its workings to comment on it.

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I agree with the getting rid of the bipartisan system. While I'm very liberal there are a few things I would change if I were in charge that may agree with a different party, but since the Democratic Party is mostly what I agree with I would vote that 11 times out of 10 over the Republican Party.

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But what about the option of voting for a third party that you agree with rather than one of the two major ones?  When you're old enough to vote, that vote is a step towards ending the bipartisan system so we truly have options, rather than just Republican/Democrat.  When we refer to them as the "lesser of two evils" we're acknowledging that neither truly has our best interest in mind.  We have the power to change this though, we just have to be willing to change it.

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There are possible downsides to having more than two parties. We have a logjam with only two parties. Imagine if we had three, four, five parties all vying to get their legislation passed. Would anything ever get done? (This isn't rhetorical. I'm really not sure).

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There are possible downsides to having more than two parties. We have a logjam with only two parties. Imagine if we had three, four, five parties all vying to get their legislation passed. Would anything ever get done? (This isn't rhetorical. I'm really not sure).

Nothing would get done, almost ALL politicians just pout and cry when they don't get their way and refuse to work with anyone.

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Nothing would get done, almost ALL politicians just pout and cry when they don't get their way and refuse to work with anyone.

 

Hate to be cynical, but you've got that right! I know there are excpetions to every rule, but in general this seems to be the trend.

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Nothing would get done, almost ALL politicians just pout and cry when they don't get their way and refuse to work with anyone.

 

 

This is kind of true.  Other than we do have politicians in the House and Senate that are third parties.  For example Ron Paul (not to say I fully agree with him, but just to use him as an example) has been a congressman on and off since 1976.  Obviously he stirs up some noise, but that's necessary for us to see that we have options.  This also doesn't stop Congress from working and continuing to function.  There is also the fact that states are allowed to pass and change laws for their own jurisdiction (Colorado and Washington legalizing marijuana, as an example.  Given, we still have yet to see how this might be effected by federal courts).

 

Sorry, politics are kind of a passion of mine...  Someday I hope to become a politician myself, so topics like this are of major interest to me.

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Politics are a passion of mine too, I can spend hours debating things if someone started it, I had a political debate with my teacher in the middle of class, she got wrecked.

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What bothers me is when people have more allegiance to their chosen political party than they do to critical thinking. 

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What bothers me is when people have more allegiance to their chosen political party than they do to critical thinking.

That annoys me too, people blindly following a party because of what the news says about the opposite party, I myself am fairly happy with my party minus a few issues they hadn't even touched on.

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What about making a "throw away" vote. Meaning you vote for a party that you like, even though you know it has a zero chance of winning? Or should I vote for the second party I like (in this case, tolerate) because I know there is definitely a chance of them becoming the provincial party?

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Whether you are actively political or completely apathetic you should vote. The rationale for this is that while you may not like politics you have the ability to influence change. Also, the notion of "if you don't vote you can't complain," is really smart. Voting is important because for thousands of years, many different people (African-american, women, British-Hindus) never had the chance to vote as they were seen as second class citizens. You should be proud you have the opportunity to influence change.  

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