Sophie

Is it true that Christians hate Jews?

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When I thought of hatred against Jews, the only things that came to mind were Nazis, Neo-Nazis, Muslims, and Arab Countries. Okay, that's a lot, too much, but I figured if someone wasn't a Neo-Nazi, or Muslim, why would they hate Jews? But I learned recently that there are Christians out there who hate Jews because "they killed Jesus." I have no clue what that means. Were his disciples Jewish or something? Anyways, is it common for Christians to hate Jews cuz we killed Jesus? I still don't know what that means though.

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Well the people/authorities that wanted and had Jesus crucified were Jewish. He was claiming to be God, their God, and was gaining  a substantial following; to the majority, this made him a dangerous heretic. Is it common for Christians to hate Jews? Not in my experience; quite the opposite actually

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Yes, we burn Jews at the stake as a form of recreation :D

 

Seriously though, true Christians shouldn't hate anyone. We are called to love all people. The fact that Jesus came to be crucified and die in the manner He did was all part of His purpose, which is to pay the final price for the sins of all mankind. Technically it was the Romans who directly killed Jesus in accordance to the demands of the Jews. But in reality, all of mankind is responsible for His death because it was our sin that brought Him to sacrifice Himself in the only way our sins could be forgiven.

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I don't think Christians hate Jews. We aren't thought to hate anyone

 

John 13:34-35

 
A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; even as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.â€
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No not at all. We love them :D

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There are several things that need to be kept in mind when answering this question.   The first is the definition of a Christian.  There are many people who self-identify as Christian, but claiming to be Christian doesn't necessarily mean that the person is following the teachings of Jesus or believes in the tenants of the Christian faith.  There are many nominal Christians out there who have no clue what real Christianity is.  Others were raised in churches that claim to be Christian, but the gospel message is not being taught in those churches. 

 

For some people, they consider themselves Christian because they wrongly think that Christian = a good person.   So, they may never have gone to church before, but they think of themselves as a "good person."  They know that they do not belong to another religious group, so they think they are automatically Christian.  Some of these individuals might have been baptized in a church as an infant, but their baptism was the only time that their parents brought them to church, etc.  Many mainline denominations teach that being baptized means that a person is a member of the Christian church.  So, using that definition, many people would fit...but that doesn't mean they were raised in the Christian faith.

 

Our culture accepts a very, very broad definition of what a Christian is, as do many churches.

 

There are also many churches that teach things that are contrary to the Bible....and would go against Jesus' teachings.....some of these teachings are extra biblical things....

 

And then there is the problematic teachings and actions throughout church history.   There have been groups of self-identified Christians who have done awful things to Jews.  There have been leaders of the church who have written awful things, including Martin Luther.  There were some early Christian leaders who also said and taught hateful things about Jews and their religious practices :(    So even church leaders have behaved in unbiblical ways to the Jews.  :(

 

After Christianity was legalized in Rome, and was made the state religion, Christianity was seen more as a political cause or at the very least a political affiliation.   I'm thinking that this is the reason why "Christians" behaved in shameful ways towards Jews in the Crusades and the Inquisition :(  

 

So, there is no denying that Christianity as an institution has hated Jews in the past.   :(

 

However, please keep in mind that what individuals who identified as Christian did and said does not necessarily reflect what Jesus taught, or what the Bible teaches.  

 

I'll continue to respond to this question in the next post, as this response is getting long.

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When I thought of hatred against Jews, the only things that came to mind were Nazis, Neo-Nazis, Muslims, and Arab Countries. Okay, that's a lot, too much, but I figured if someone wasn't a Neo-Nazi, or Muslim, why would they hate Jews? But I learned recently that there are Christians out there who hate Jews because "they killed Jesus." I have no clue what that means. Were his disciples Jewish or something? Anyways, is it common for Christians to hate Jews cuz we killed Jesus? I still don't know what that means though.

This is part two of my response:

So, there is no doubt that some Christians have hated Jews in the past.   There is also no doubt that some who identify as Christians today also hate Jews :(

 

However, those who have hated Jews should not be thought as representatives of all Christians, the majority of Christians, Jesus' teachings, biblical teachings, or the basic tenants of the Christian faith.  As others have said in this thread, hatred of the Jewish people is NOT true Christian teaching.

 

Those Christians who have hated Jews in the past, and those who hate Jews now, did/do not take into account the following:

1.)  Jesus Himself was Jewish.   He was born into a Jewish family, and He practiced the Jewish faith.

 

2.)  All of the 12 disciples/apostles (whatever word someone wants to use for them) were Jewish.

 

3.)  Many, many of the early followers of Jesus were Jewish.

 

4.)  Most of the Bible, including the New Testament, were written by Jews.  I think that the only exception to this was Luke -- who wrote Luke and Acts.

 

5.)  Christianity originally began as a sect within Judaism. 

 

6.)  That Jesus' main purpose for coming to earth was in order to die for all humanity.   Jesus said this over and over and over again.   He knew He was going to die in the manner that He did.   This was part of God's plan.

 

7.)  The reason that Jesus died was so that people could be reconciled back to God, they could have their sins forgiven, etc.  Jesus' death was a sacrifice so that people could have eternal life.

 

8.)  That Jesus allowed what happened to happen when it happened.   Jesus could have stopped Himself from being arrested.  He said as much when He was about to be arrested.

 

9.)  That it was actually Romans who put Jesus to death.  Crucifixion was a Roman form of capital punishment, not a Jewish one.

 

10.)  Jesus' death was not the end.   There was also Jesus physical, bodily resurrection.  Jesus isn't dead; He is alive.

 

 

Also, they need to think about the time and place in which Jesus lived.   As a Jew, He lived among other Jews.    Some of the Jews became His followers, and some rejected Him.  That's only natural -- as any leader is going to draw some who will accept them, and some that will reject them.  Because of the things that Jesus was claiming about Himself, and the things He was teaching, many of the religious leaders were opposed to Him.   Not all of them, though.   Again, this only makes logical sense.  Since He was a Jew, and lived among Jews, most of the opposition would have come from His own people.  There weren't many non-Jews living where He did who would have cared much.  

 

Therefore, it was Jews who cried out for Jesus to be crucified.   The crowd was made up of Jews because of the time and place where Jesus lived.   The point of the gospel message isn't to say that the Jews are to blame for Jesus' death, etc.   The point is that humans condemned Him to death because humans are sinful.   If Jesus had lived in modern times, then I'm sure there would have been representatives from all over the world who would have cried out, "Crucify Him!" 

 

Had Jesus been European, then the Europeans would have condemned Him to death.  Had Jesus been American, then it would have been Americans who would have condemned Him to death (if America had existed back then), etc.

 

The point of the Christian faith isn't to place blame on someone for Jesus' death.   Any Christian who does this is missing out on the entire gospel message. 

 

As others have mentioned, Jesus taught His followers to love one another.  This is a message that is clearly laid out in the New Testament over and over again.   John even wrote in his letters that anyone who hates does not know God.

 

So....that was a long way of answering your question.  No, it is not common for true Christians to hate Jews.

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Look this has been answered well but I really must clarify and add my thoughts; since I have also heard this false statement. So just to be clear:

Christians don't hate jews!

The most obvious reason why this would be such a falsehood is that as Vince said Christians are commanded by Christ to not hate anyone but instead love (1 Corinthians 13:13 ; Matthew 22:36-40) First off this would be really stupid since Christianty is born entirely out of Judism thus is it often refered to as Judeo-Christianty. Reasons for this being that we still beilieve in the Old Testament (Torah) and we abide by its laws and traditons.

Next let me clear up something for anyone who didn't know; Christ was a jew and so were his apostles. Another false statement mentioned above is that the people in charge of the crucifixion of Christ were jews; wrong. Christ was both beaten and cruxified by Roman centurions under Roman rule but not in accordance with Roman law. So do Christians hate Italians? Hope not since I am Italian; so are a lot of Roman Catholics who also are Christians.

Now yes, it is true that a crowd of jews brought Christ to the roman ruler Pontius Pilate to be crucified but he found no fault with him and 'washed his hands' of the situation and turned Christ over to the angry crowd of jews to do with him what they wanted. Their cry was 'Crucify Him, Crucify Him!' So roman centurions did exactly that as the crowd of jews stood by and jeered as Christ was cruxified. However to further prove that this was a roman crucifiction not done by jews (though no one else was allowed to crucifiy people except roman centurions) the inscripton the roman centurions placed at the top of the cross read 'The King of the Jews' in order to further antagonize the crowd of jews.

Further it would be impossible for any believing Christian to have been a nazi or a neo-nazi. Further several Christians hid Jews during nazi rule see the story of Cory Ten Boom.

Though there are radical factions of every faith in the world further there are several denominations of each faith and not one believes exactly the same precepts. No I am not comparing other denominations of Christianity or speaking down about them except for those factions that hate Jews. Other Christians are welcome to disagree with me but this is what I believe.

There are other blindingly obvious reasons why it is so false and why it would be so wrong for any Christian to hate a Jew but these are a few. Please forgive me of my rant and go with Christ in love.

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Wow, there are a lot of educational answers here! I didn't even know a quarter of this stuff. Thank you! :)

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Wow. I am both surprised and not surprised that someone would think this. Some self-proclaimed Christians show only hate and destruction and give true Christians a bad name. This happens in most if not all religions though. 

 

There are some great answers on this subject. Not only was Jesus Jewish himself but Jesus came to the world to be an example unto us. He taught us to love everyone. Another important lesson that came out of the crucifixion of Jesus was one of forgiveness. The Romans nailed Jesus to the the cross but the Jews turned him over to the Romans because they did not want to put someone to death so close to Passover. That would not have gone over well with the Jewish people. Then they cheered for his crucifixion over the the crucifixion of a murder. Despite all this, Jesus forgave them. On the cross, He proclaimed this when He said, "Forgive them, Father for they know not what they do." He forgave them while He was still on the cross. If we cannot forgive them all these centuries later, we must reevaluate who we are following. I know we all need forgiveness and like Arwen said if Jesus had lived in Europe, it would have been Europeans that needed to be forgiven. 

 

I actually have had the opportunity to celebrate Hanukkah and I was wanting to celebrate Passover but my schedule didn't allow for it.  :/

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I'll add a little myself. The best comparison I can say would be like how Muslims in the west are treated after 9/11. The actions of the few are interpreted as the actions of the whole. Jews have always faced persecution because they are treated as the ones who killed Jesus even though it was the Romans who did it and the ones who turned him over were a minority of the Jews. So a minority of self labeled "Christians" tend not to like Jews. I say self labelled because if you are truly a Christian than you would not be hating anyone at all.

Sadly as others have said, the negative actions of the few tends to be interpreted as the voice of the many even when the many do positive actions.

Arwen says it quite excellently.

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Also to add, Jesus had to die on the cross cause of the sin of all the world. Its cause of my sin that He was slain. It is cause of the entire world. This was in the Father's plan so that all of us can recieve eternal life. In Scripture we see that God still has big plans for the Jews, His chosen people. They are the children of Abraham. Paul says in Romans 11:17 that we, the gentiles, have been grafted in with the branches from Abraham's olive tree. So anti-semitism has no ground to stand on for a Christian.

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This is probably going to be long and this thread is already filled with long responses.  Rightly so.  This is a lot deeper question than it might appear on the surface.  There have already been some good answers given.  A lot of facts have been given in the other responses so I will not repeat them.  I can only add my perspective to the matter, which is probably something you will not hear elsewhere.  This probably won't be as well-written as some of my other posts.  I'm in rush this morning but, I will do my best.

A lot of Christian antisemitism stems from factors such as someone never reading and/or truly understanding the Bible, not having a relationship with God and/or, not liking what they have read in the Bible.  As Arwen said, not everyone who claims to be a Christian really is one.  Being a Christian means having a working, viable, real-time relationship with God.  It means loving Him and cherishing Him.  One of the major and necessary components of that relationship is learning and understanding God's story and what's in his heart, then ministering to and caring for that part of Him.  God's story, in regard to human beings, is a love story -- plain and simple.  If you read the Bible with any kind of understanding at all, you see that.

The Jewish people are one of God's loves.  He loved them and cherished them imensely and He still does.  They are a big part of God's love story.  They posses a significant portion of His heart.  The nature of love, even with God, is that when you fall deeply in love with someone they gain an irretrievable piece of your heart.  Ask anyone who has gone through a major breakup or divorce.  The person you lose takes a significant, important piece of your heart and it is something that you don't ever get back from them.  Some part of you will always be with them; some part of you will always love them and care about them.

God gave the Jews a huge chunk of His heart.  If someone hates the Jews, then they are hating a massive piece of God's heart; they are essentially hating God himself.  When God loves someone, when they gain a piece of his heart, he doesn't just take it back whenever they hurt him.  If that were the case, the first time a Christian sinned they would lose God.  That simply doesn't happen.  God loves us.  He sticks around through thick and thin.  He doesn't leave, even when we are ugly to him.

True love is probably the most die-hard thing in all of existence.  Just because someone rejects you or your love, it doesn't necessarily mean you stop having feelings for them or stop caring about them, it just means that you move on and you find someone else who will accecpt your love and apprecieate it.  When you have love in your heart it must go somewhere, it must be lavished upon another.  If it isn't, it spoils and rots inside of you.  That is simply what happened with God,  the Jews, and the gentiles.  Many people, Jew and Gentile both, don't seem to get that. (Gentile is simply a way of saying non-Jew.)

The nature of human beings is to form an exact picture and idea in our hearts and minds of exactly how something will be or transpire when it is promised to us.  In Jesus time, the Jews had been waiting a long, long time for God to come to earth and save them.  They had countless centuries to imagine and contrive the way He would do that.  What they were expecting in Jesus' time was for God to come and crush the invading Romans and drive them out.

God was less concerned about the Romans than he was about what happened to people, particularly the Jews, when they died.  So he came to take the punishment for people's sin and wrong doing so they would not have to endure it themselves.  He came to suffer Hell so that people would not have to.  The Jews weren't expecting or wanting that.  They wanted God to save them from the pain and opression that they were experienceing, in the heat of the moment, at the hands of the Romans.  They were looking for an earthly hero and saviour, not a spiritual one.  When Jesus turned out to be the latter, they rejected him and rejected the gift of love that he offered to them.

As is the nature of love, God moved on and found another who would accept his gift of love, rather than let it go to waste and spoil within his heart.  Those who accept that gift are known as Christians, the bulk of whom just happen to be Gentiles or, non-jews.  Just because God chose to love we Christians and give us that gift, it doesn't mean that He stopped loving the Jews or that His gift, His offer of redemption for them no longer stands.  Quite the contrary is true.  What some Christians fail to understand is that in order to fully love God, you must also love the Jewish people because a great deal of His heart, His love, and His spirit is still with them and likely always will be.

To kind of even things out, on the flip side of this coin, there is an extreme amount of prejudice and hatered on the part of many Jews for Christians.  They think we have chosen to follow a fraud and a blasphemer and pretty much hate us for that.  They consider Christians "fallen Jews."  In the end it's just people being people.  No matter what walk of life, race, class, religion, nationality you look in, you are going to find prejudice and hatred for other people.  Some people are bent on hating others and they will find whatever reason they can to justify that hatered in their own minds.  For some who claim to be Christians, they see Jews as an easily justifiable target.  For people who have that predispostion to hate, if it wasn't Jews that they were hating it would be another group of people.

Anyway, that is a highly condensed, if not haphazardly sumarized, version of what I have written elswhere.  When it's all said and done, God makes it clear numerous times in the Bible that the Jewish people are to be loved.

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I actually have had the opportunity to celebrate Hanukkah and I was wanting to celebrate Passover but my schedule didn't allow for it.  :/

 

I like celebrating Chanukkah a little more just in terms of the food, and the ceremony isn't nearly as long, but Passover is a great experience if you celebrate it in a traditional way, or with a bit of tradition. Definitely an interesting experience.

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Short Answer: For the most part, NO! Christians who know what it is to follow Jesus are called to love everyone, no matter what. I personally bear Jews no ill will for anything, especially not for killing Jesus. I don't think it was particularly their fault to begin with, any even if it was, contemporary Jews had nothing to do with it.

 

Long Answer: Everyone else has already said it so well, but if I am going to blame anyone for Jesus's death, I should begin with Adam & Eve at the Garden of Eden and go from there. Or better yet, I should start by pointing the finger at myself. I caused him to take the cross as much as any Jew or Roman. I've heard it said, and I agree, that it was love that held Jesus to the cross, not nails.

 

Besides, if Jesus had come into our time, rather than theirs, who is to say that I wouldn't have been part of that mob cheering for his death? Jesus already knew he was going to die; it was the master plan. The Jews and the Romans were just acting their parts in God's rescue mission for mankind; Christ prayed for them even as he was being killed. Jesus died, not because someone killed him, but willingly, knowing it was the only way to redeem us. It had to happen in order for salvation to be possible. Also, the Jews and Romans may have been the ones to kill Jesus, but they couldn't keep him dead; I believe he rose again. As a Christian, I believe that he is alive!

 

But yes, I consider myself equally to blame for the pain Jesus suffered. It was my sin he died for, out of love for me. And I too could have easily been one of the ones who cried out for his death. I am blessed with his grace and forgiveness!

 

It's like the bridge of this song, starting at 1:46.

 

 

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Long Answer: Everyone else has already said it so well, but if I am going to blame anyone for Jesus's death, I should begin with Adam & Eve at the Garden of Eden and go from there. Or better yet, I should start by pointing the finger at myself. I caused him to take the cross as much as any Jew or Roman. I've heard it said, and I agree, that it was love that held Jesus to the cross, not nails.

 

Besides, if Jesus had come into our time, rather than theirs, who is to say that I wouldn't have been part of that mob cheering for his death? Jesus already knew he was going to die; it was the master plan. The Jews and the Romans were just acting their parts in God's rescue mission for mankind; Christ prayed for them even as he was being killed. Jesus died, not because someone killed him, but willingly, knowing it was the only way to redeem us. It had to happen in order for salvation to be possible. Also, the Jews and Romans may have been the ones to kill Jesus, but they couldn't keep him dead; I believe he rose again. As a Christian, I believe that he is alive!

 

But yes, I consider myself equally to blame for the pain Jesus suffered. It was my sin he died for, out of love for me. And I too could have easily been one of the ones who cried out for his death. I am blessed with his grace and forgiveness!

Exactly.

 

That's why the liturgy for the Good Friday service in the United Methodist Church (and I'm assuming many other churches, denominations, etc.) closes with us calling out for Jesus to be crucified.

 

For those who don't know, Good Friday is the Friday before Easter.  It's the day that Christians remember Jesus' death on the cross.  It's a very touching, powerful, and emotional service.  

 

We have the altar stripped, and the Bible is slammed shut.   We admit that we are sinners, and that we are responsible for Jesus' death.  Had we been there, we would have joined in the crowd crying for Jesus to be crucified.

 

I found the bulletin from this years service.   Here is the closing litany:

Pastor: We gathered with the crowd and raised palms to praise Him,

People: then we shouted, CRUCIFY HIM!

Pastor: We went with you to the temple to cleanse it,

People: then we shouted, CRUCIFY HIM!

Pastor: We sat at the table with you for the "Last Supper",

People: then we shouted, CRUCIFY HIM!

Pastor: We promised never to leave you,

People: then we shouted, CRUCIFY HIM!

Pastor: We see the cross, the work is done:  Christ has died.

People: Our Lord has become our sacrifice.

All: Father, forgive us, we know what we have done.

 

 

So in essence, we are admitting that we, as humans, as sinners called for Jesus to be crucified.

 

I like celebrating Chanukkah a little more just in terms of the food, and the ceremony isn't nearly as long, but Passover is a great experience if you celebrate it in a traditional way, or with a bit of tradition. Definitely an interesting experience.

I've never had the opportunity to celebrate an authentic Jewish Passover, but I have had the pleasure in celebrating a Christian one.   That might sound strange to say a Christian Passover, as Passover is a Jewish holiday.....

 

But....Jesus and His followers, as Jews, celebrated the Passover.  In fact, it was Passover that Jesus and His followers were celebrating during the Last Supper.  This is why Passover is often times close to Easter.  So, a lot of churches have started holding Christian Passovers on Maundy Thursday (the Thursday before Easter.)   It's also from the Passover that Christians get Communion/Eucharist.  The bread and the wine for that were taken right out of the Passover.  :)

 

The pastors that I've had that have led a Christian Passover searched the Internet and various other resources to find liturgy for the seder, trying to make it as authentic as they could, and they also applied Christian meaning to things as well.  One pastor who did this actually grew up Jewish, so his was probably closer to being authentic than some of the others.

 

I found the Christian version of Passover to be very meaningful.  

 

So this is yet another reason why it makes no sense for Christians to hate Jews.

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But yes, I consider myself equally to blame for the pain Jesus suffered. It was my sin he died for, out of love for me. And I too could have easily been one of the ones who cried out for his death. I am blessed with his grace and forgiveness!

 

This definitely.  The primary way I have always viewed God's sacrifice is on a personal level.

I cannot blame the Jews.  They were unable to see the unfathomable acts of love that were taking place in their spiritual world because of the pain and agony of their physical world.  I cannot blame them for that because I sometimes find myself veering down that same path.  I think most people end up doing that from time to time, perhaps, more often than not for many.

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There maybe some christians who hate jews/muslims but those are still dont understand what the bible says. they are still in the process of ripening. im sure the more they study bible the more they understand everything. Reading bible is just a game of Slots Uk

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Im a Catholic and I never heard of hatred for jews in our churches, but my father came from the middle east in the 1950's and in lebanon the muslim people there taught that Jews would hang you from a stake and drink the blood that slowly seeped from your body.

 

When he came to new york in 1957 to his surprise the only people that helped him when he needed help whetehr it was business or anything were his jewish friends. No one else bothered to help, and he has had many jewish friends throughout his whole life. they respected my dad because he was a hard worker and a straighter shooter and he formed his opinions of people not based on race or religion but on how honest they were with him.

 

This always brought back to mind the famous saying of Doctor martin Luther King Junior "I have a dream that one day a man will be judged not upon the color of his skin but on the content of his character.

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I am a Christian and I don't hate Jews. Besides Jesus was born a Jew. I did however used to feel bad because I thought God liked them better since they were the chosen people. I felt like "Why bother?" If God loves them best. If anything it made me wish I was born Jewish lol. I never hated Jews. Nor do I hate anyone. And anyway Pontius Pilate was not a Jew and he basically ordered Jesus's death and had him beaten.

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I like celebrating Chanukkah a little more just in terms of the food, and the ceremony isn't nearly as long, but Passover is a great experience if you celebrate it in a traditional way, or with a bit of tradition. Definitely an interesting experience.

 

I am an adopted kid.

 

My first recollection of religion was in one of the first foster families I lived with ( 13 in all). They were Catholic and we attended mass and I made my first communion there. I celebrated my first Christmas with them at 4yrs old.

 

I was eventually adopted by an Athiest family. We did not celebrate any religious holiday.

 

I am in NO WAY linking child abuse to the Athiest. It just so happens that that family had to surrender me because of child abuse. I was later adopted by another family.

 

My second adoptive father was Jewish, my adoptive mother Protestant converting to the Jewish faith. Considering my varied past my parents celebrated both Christian and Jewish holidays. I enjoyed participating in the Passover service. I also loved celebrating Chanukkah. I am grateful for the experience.  

 

I am a follwer of Jesus Christ. I do not hate anyone and pray for everyone. Thats what Jesus would do!

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I am an adopted kid.

 

My first recollection of religion was in one of the first foster families I lived with ( 13 in all). They were Catholic and we attended mass and I made my first communion there. I celebrated my first Christmas with them at 4yrs old.

 

I was eventually adopted by an Athiest family. We did not celebrate any religious holiday.

 

I am in NO WAY linking child abuse to the Athiest. It just so happens that that family had to surrender me because of child abuse. I was later adopted by another family.

 

My second adoptive father was Jewish, my adoptive mother Protestant converting to the Jewish faith. Considering my varied past my parents celebrated both Christian and Jewish holidays. I enjoyed participating in the Passover service. I also loved celebrating Chanukkah. I am grateful for the experience.  

 

I am a follwer of Jesus Christ. I do not hate anyone and pray for everyone. Thats what Jesus would do!

Wow thats some history that makes you a very very wise lady. And well done to you too. Xxxx

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