Sophie

Were you raised religious, did you choose religion, did you change denominations/religions?

37 posts in this topic

Nope I have only been in church about twice in my life. Not many people in my family seem religous. I was raised to believe in God but I didn't know much about Him till about last year. You can say I had an evangelistic experience after a desperate prayer one day. My life has not been the same since.

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I was baptized and confirmed, even though my parents are just culturally Catholic--neither of them attend Mass or anything (except maybe on Christmas once a year). They never forced anything on me. I believe in God, but I don't know what I would label myself as.

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I was raised southern Baptist and though I never fell away from my Christianity I did reaffirm the belief while in college. So I guess you could say I actually chose it while in college; the rest was just doing what my parents raised me to do.

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Raised Christian, became Agnostic by choice, returned to Christianity by further choice, now more devout than ever and it's the absolute BEST feeling ;)

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My situation is similar to Dasboy1 I grew up in a difficult environment with some very dark times I wasnt raised to be in any religion, but I know it was God that brought me out with a loving and kind heart.

As a kid my aunt would sometimes take me and my sister to church with her but I always thought it was boring and sometimes scary. Being there made me scared of God and almost ashamed but in my heart I knew the love for God isnt supposed to be like that. For as long as I can remember I have always loved and had relationship with the Lord I felt like he held my hand through the dark and scary times.  Therefore I am spiritual and follow Christ, I guess that means Im Christian but I dont like that label because of what many "Hypochristians" and religions portray but I also know that the real christians are good people sadly its hard to tell the difference nowadays...I didnt choose anything he chose me...for some reason and I will not turn my back to that I will be forever grateful.

Thats my story :)

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I was raised in a Roman Catholic household and was baptized, received First Communion, and was confirmed as well. When I went to college, I got involved in a group called Campus Crusade for Christ and they were more of a non-denominational group. I strayed away from my Catholic faith for about two or three years in late high school/early college because I felt like I didn't have the chance to decide for myself that I was Catholic. I was just kind of told growing up that I was Catholic.

 

My senior year of high school when I turned 17, I started to question. I explored other branches of Christianity and also asked my neighbors and Jewish friends about their religion, but was called back to Catholicism at around age 20. The more I learned about Catholicism, the more I was drawn back to it. I appreciate my family's Catholic traditions now more than I ever did before and I go to Mass regularly on my own now. I definitely label myself as a Catholic, but I am happy I went through a questioning period and came to the conclusion on my own.

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I was baptized and confirmed in the United Church of Christ (one of the more progressive mainline Protestant denominations), but after my confirmation, I briefly fell away from God. I played around with agnosticism for a year or two, but I was never happy in unbelief. One thing led to another, and I transferred from my public high school to a private Christian school for academic and personal reasons.

 

Two months later, I experienced the overwhelming warmth of God's love. As a self-proclaimed agnostic, it terrified me at first, but little by little I returned to Christ. At first I accepted the more conservative Calvinist theology that my school taught, but since I've graduated and started college, I've returned to the much more liberal and progressive theology of the UCC, and I've never been happier. And, of course, I feel called to the ministry, so I'm going to be a pastor! So yes, I'm definitely religious  :)

 

I guess you could say I was raised in the church, then left, then returned!

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I grew up in a strict catholic family. I've been a catholic all my life and keep all the teachings very close to my heart :) I've never changed denominations or religion and feel blessed that I was catholic all my Life. Praise the Lord :)

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I was raised in a non religious home. I didn't know who Jesus Christ was until I was 19 in my first year of college. I would consider myself Atheist from 0-20 yrs old, until I chose to be Christian when I was 20. I consider myself non-denominational. I've attended church service with 7th Day Adventists and Jehovah Witnesses but I don't want to join either group. I wouldn't have an issue being non-denominational my whole life.

It's like every denomination says they're right and the other is wrong so I'd rather be alone then be pointing fingers and being full of myself like some church leaders seem to be. I don't want to be part of that.

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My mom was catholic, my dad was Baptist, yet somehow we went to a Pentecostal church, then after dad disagreed with some of the messages we had this long break, but during that time i was going to all the churches youths because i wanted to see how they all were...my favorite was this one youth group entitled (culture shock) at a (word of life church) which basically was the most revolutionary....they were labeled as a cult by the other churches...and had the funniest rumors about them...but the people were so ''real''(I remember them talking about how an atheist used to go to it and sit in the back and blaspheme God, he later became one of the worship leaders...all the people that go to that church are damaged from life and they know it and they go there to get fixed...that's church to me...a hospital for the broken) I compare those experiences to the one time i went to a catholic church and got an evil glare from everyone like i didn't belong there at all...and it was soooo boring....now i sing in a choir at a ''church of God church'' i don't know what kind that is..but its probably similar to Baptist since my dad still agrees with it...then every anniversary my dad takes me to a baptist church that he helped build in the town he used to live in and they welcome us like a family...Im non-denominational  But my dads Baptist influences and that youths views about reaching out and being an example and revolutionary are probably my biggest motivators....religion has always been around me everywhere I went but it wasn't till my ''second chance'' that it all clicked on me

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I was raised in a home where my mom was a practicing Catholic and dad who called himself a Christian.

During my twenties I started looking into researching other religions (many others) including different Christian religions , and saw that every religion has some truth in it.

My research always took me back to Christianity and since that, I wanted to understand what the early Christians believed and taught so I studied the writings of the apostolic fathers (clement of Rome , ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp , the Didache), as well as the early church fathers that proceeded them (Justin Marty , clement of Alexandria , tertullian etc) and I learned that they were catholic in their beliefs . This is what brought me back to Catholicism and I've been there ever since.

But my foray into other religions like Buddhism, Islam and the many other Christian denominations taught me a great respect for the beliefs of others and I focused on connecting with them on the things we shared in common.

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