Sophie

Were you raised religious, did you choose religion, did you change denominations/religions?

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I'm just curious to see if anyone became religious later on in their lives, or was brought up very religious, or chose to change denominations or religions.

Unlike most people on this site, I have no religion at all. I was raised an atheist by my father (much to the chagrin of my mother and her mother,) so atheism was as natural as breathing to me. I was in grade three or four before I actually realized that people out there DID believe in god and angels and such. I thought the bible was like Greek mythology - accepted as fascinating, human-made stories. I thought everyone thought that God was fake, like Zeus. When I learned this was not the case, I became agnostic due to very heavy confusion about the whole thing. I though "if so many people believe, how can it not be real?" But then I learned that there were religions other than Christianity and Judaism, and I began to learn about various cults, and religion-status cults like Scientology, and I realized people thought a whole bunch of different things. So I returned to atheism. That's my story. :)

Edit: Just realized that I could have put this in the religion section...

Edited by Sophie

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Edit: Just realized that I could have put this in the religion section...

Moved to Religious Topics :)

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@Sophie: What religion did ur mother follow, may I ask?

I was raised religious and still try my best to be!

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@Sophie: What religion did ur mother follow, may I ask?

My mom was raised Christian in a relatively religious household, but besides believing in God and praying, I doubt she's been to church in decades. As for her denomination...she said "United Church, similar to Angelican." Does that make sense? I have no idea what that means.

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I was raised catholic, but I'm non denominational now. I'm a lot more religious than the rest of my family.

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I was raised catholic, everyone in my family and im related to is a catholic but im agnostic.

Never really believed in god since day 1 i just went with it, reading the bible and never seeing or hearing god

caused me to give upmy belief

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Hi! I'm Indian. I was born in a traditional conservative Hindu family. My parents took me to temples but they didn't make me read Hindu religious books or anything. I believed so firmly in God once upon a time but I later became atheist and denounced all my gods.

I'm now deist, meaning I believe in God without religion. I'm not fixated on it though. All our beliefs change as we grow up.

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Yes, I was influenced by my mom and my grandmother. I've never changed religion and I'm not denominational.

I'll be honest, I actually reject the word religion.....hence, I am not "religious" I consider religion a manmade concept but I do on the other hand have "a relationship with God" or a "relationship with the creator" I view "religion as manmade concepts and rule and traditions people started rather than a personal one on one "seeking of God"

I'm curious, I've not known too many "true" atheists.....meaning I've known people who said they were atheists but it ended up being that they actually did believe that the universe was made by an immensly powerful being of such power, knowledge and wisdom that the human mind couldn't even conceive of it what the sticking point was.....they didn't believe in a God like (fill in the blank). Whatever faith you could bring up....they just didn't agree with a God "being like that". The main example...the God of christianity...God of Abraham, Isaac & Jacob....Israel's God, who sent his son Jesus to give himself to pay the price of rebellion and sin that we couldn't pay ourselves......I've heard many say I can't believe in a God like that. If he loves us why is there suffering, how can he love us and let people hurt each other and let children suffer and things along those lines. They'd sum it up with something like....."I could never believe in a God like that" but they didn't actually go all the way and say that there was literally no creator in any sense at all and that once you die that's it. If you have a life of suffering and die in a tragedy at the age of 7 then tough luck......that's all there was and it's all over...........forever.

Are you truly of the mindset of there literally is zero creator, this universe and humanity (people with consciences who know right from wrong, good from evil who can love or hate) just somehow got here all on its own from nothing or do you believe deep down that there is something behind all of this but you don't think that "thing" is the God you heard about from various faiths? I'm curious to know?

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Hi! I'm Indian. I was born in a traditional conservative Hindu family. My parents took me to temples but they didn't make me read Hindu religious books or anything. I believed so firmly in God once upon a time but I later became atheist and denounced all my gods.

I'm now deist, meaning I believe in God without religion. I'm not fixated on it though. All our beliefs change as we grow up.

Hi,

When I think of India and marriage (this being a site about waiting until marriage) I often think of "arranged marriages" where the parents of the husband and wife choose the spouses and you marry someone who is unknown to you. I was curious to know if that is the tradition that you will have or will you actually choose your own husband? I'm not trying to get too personal, ignore the question if you like.....I was just curious.

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Hi,

When I think of India and marriage (this being a site about waiting until marriage) I often think of "arranged marriages" where the parents of the husband and wife choose the spouses and you marry someone who is unknown to you. I was curious to know if that is the tradition that you will have or will you actually choose your own husband? I'm not trying to get too personal, ignore the question if you like.....I was just curious.

Just to let u know that in arranged marriages, there is still a spectrum of definitions. What I mean is some are the parents matchmaking you with a stranger, some are when parents matchmake you with someone you know (generally a close family friend or someone to strengthen ties). But in any case, consent is given by both the prospective bride and groom; if either is forced, it becomes a forced marriage, not arranged! Just wanted to make this point (I come from a culture of arranged marriages too :) ) !

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Raised Roman Catholic! Still a firm believer. My family isn't super religious, though I feel as if I am the most religious of the family.

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Yeah, I was raised Catholic, went to a Catholic school, and whatnot. My family's Catholic, but they're not particularly devout: my dad doesn't go to church or anything any more, and my mum's practising, but she doesn't agree with absolutely everything the Church teaches. So I'm kind of the most devout in my family, I think...

I actually don't think there's that big a difference between cradle-Catholics and people who later become Catholics. It's one thing to be raised a Catholic, but it's a whole other thing to stay Catholic. When you're, say, five years old, you believe in God and go to Mass and whatnot because your family does, and you've no reason to question anything. But you get to about 13 or 14, you're old enough to think for yourself, and then you have to decide if you want to continue practising Catholicism.

I saw that in my high school. Because it was a Catholic high school, the vast majority of people there had been brought up Catholic, but that didn't mean they were all practising. Our year was really close and everyone knew each other really well. I'd say that nearly half of the people in my year who'd been brought up Catholic no longer went to Mass, or if they did, only went because their families made them go. There were some people there who considered themselves atheists or agnostic, some who believed in God, but weren't "religious" as such, and a lot of people who were practising Catholics, but they were kind of doing the bare minimum, as in, they went to Mass every week, believed in God, but weren't that into their faith.

In my own group of friends, I had one friend who said she "went to Mass, but's that's about it", one friend who said she "wasn't religious" but she was "spiritual", and one who was actually quite into her faith. The most devout person in my year was someone who went to World Youth Day, went to see the Pope when he visited Glasgow, was in a youth group at church, helped out at church, and so on. But even she, when I asked her, wasn't sure she was going to wait till marriage! Like I said, I knew almost everyone in my year, and I was the only one who was WTM, of of probably a hundred people raised Catholic.

So being raised Catholic is no guarantee that you'll still go to Mass and whatnot when you grow up. Honestly, I think that if you want to stay true to your faith (and this goes for any religion), then you have to learn about what you believe. You have to ask questions about your faith, and not just believe something "because that's what the Church teaches": you have learn why they teach it. You have to know your faith inside out before you can live your faith and love it. Personally, I think people stop being Catholic because they don't bother to learn anything about the faith. The more I learn about my faith, the stronger it gets, but if you never bother to learn, then your faith is going to crumble, because this world is hardly Catholic-friendly! You really have to want to believe.

xxx

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So being raised Catholic is no guarantee that you'll still go to Mass and whatnot when you grow up. Honestly, I think that if you want to stay true to your faith (and this goes for any religion), then you have to learn about what you believe. You have to ask questions about your faith, and not just believe something "because that's what the Church teaches": you have learn why they teach it. You have to know your faith inside out before you can live your faith and love it. Personally, I think people stop being Catholic because they don't bother to learn anything about the faith. The more I learn about my faith, the stronger it gets, but if you never bother to learn, then your faith is going to crumble, because this world is hardly Catholic-friendly! You really have to want to believe.

xxx

I don't entirely agree with you. I feel like learning about one's religion can help them stay in it, but I think it can also convince them it is not right for them. It is very understandable for someone to know a lot about Roman Catholocism and decide they do not believe it is right. When someone leaves their religion it is not necessarily to leave it for atheism, it can be to leave it for another denomination or religion that they have researched and decided is more correct in their teachings.

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If my last post came across as sounding like I think Roman Catholocism is the only religion or denomination that people leave for another religion or denomination I want to make it clear that I think it can be true of any religion or denomination, not just Roman Catholocism.

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I was raised very religious, I went to church 3X a week for the first 16 years of my life. I can't say that I have gone to church lately, as in the past 5 years, but I do still hold the beliefs I was raised with. So I guess you could say I'm more spiritual than religious at the moment. I fall into the chrisitan category.

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I don't entirely agree with you. I feel like learning about one's religion can help them stay in it, but I think it can also convince them it is not right for them. It is very understandable for someone to know a lot about Roman Catholocism and decide they do not believe it is right. When someone leaves their religion it is not necessarily to leave it for atheism, it can be to leave it for another denomination or religion that they have researched and decided is more correct in their teachings.

If my last post came across as sounding like I think Roman Catholocism is the only religion or denomination that people leave for another religion or denomination I want to make it clear that I think it can be true of any religion or denomination, not just Roman Catholocism.

Yeah, that's the other thing, I guess. Some people will learn more about what their religion teaches and realise they don't agree with it and want to change, so it works both ways. But me, my faith has only ever gotten stronger.

xxx

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I find it takes much more faith to believe in nothing, when i look at how peoples minds and bodies work, how vast the universe is, how small the things we are made out of are, the fact that the sun is in the perfect spot to support life, the fact that this planet just happens to have water and air and all the things necessary to support life ,the fact that all the planets all go in a specific pattern controlled by gravity and avoid colliding into each other yet keep the earth in the perfect spot to support life ,the fact that everything is made so delicately, so complex, like tons of thought was put into them,ive barely scratched the surface....i just cant believe that it all happened from random chance, i cant drop all the pieces of a computer out my window and make a computer, and no one can prove to me that the earth is millions of years old, becuase when i ask how do they know the fossils are that old? they tell me the dirt around it tells them so, then i ask, how do you know the dirt is that old? they tell me the fossils in that area tell them how old the dirt is.......

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I find it takes much more faith to believe in nothing, when i look at how peoples minds and bodies work, how vast the universe is, how small the things we are made out of are, the fact that the sun is in the perfect spot to support life, the fact that this planet just happens to have water and air and all the things necessary to support life ,the fact that all the planets all go in a specific pattern controlled by gravity and avoid colliding into each other yet keep the earth in the perfect spot to support life ,the fact that everything is made so delicately, so complex, like tons of thought was put into them,ive barely scratched the surface....

This is coming from and atheist and from someone whose friends are almost all atheists: it really does not take much faith to believe in nothing. You're not the first religious person (I'm assuming you're religious) to misunderstand how atheists feel. I've heard people say that atheists must be terrified of death because we don't believe there's anything past that, or that it must be so frustrating for us not to be able to explain things about the universe and Earth, etc. Truly, this is not the case at all. As you probably assume, we turn to science. And if there are no answers yet, we know that science is an ever-progressing subject that will be able to find a lot of the answers. And if the answers are never found, it isn't because there is no scientific answer, it's just because the answer is incredibly difficult to find and our technology will never be good enough or our brains will never be able to figure it out. I say "science doesn't have all of the answers, but it has a lot of them, it will find more, and some questions will remained unanswered but that's okay."

Just wanted to explain the atheist mind a little. :) Now the agnostic mind...yes, agnostics must go through a bit of angst about all this.

It's truly interesting to hear what religious people think about atheists. I've heard questions like "so you're not at all afraid of hell?" or "So when you die...that's it?" and some rather insulting questions like "how do you have morals?" But it really is interesting to see that a lot of religious people are just as baffled with atheism as atheists are with religious people. lol.

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I was raised religious. Actually, as a child, I found church to be boring, so I was basically forced to go. As I got older, when I could make the choice to go or not, I kept going because I began to fully understand my religion and actually started WANTING to go. I've never changed my religion. Always been a Christian. Of course, I've been curious about other religions and I still am interested in just understanding what they are all about, but there is not doubt in my mind that my religion is where I should be.

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I kinda grew up in a broken home my mom and dad never married fought a lot my dad cheated. My grandma took for about a year and then i started going on my own. I always found it fun to go to a place where I could have fun and adults seem like they cared. So I pretty much chose my religion even though I hate calling it that. My technical label is non denominational now you know the people that don't put label on Christianity.

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In my own group of friends, I had one friend who said she "went to Mass, but's that's about it", one friend who said she "wasn't religious" but she was "spiritual", and one who was actually quite into her faith. The most devout person in my year was someone who went to World Youth Day, went to see the Pope when he visited Glasgow, was in a youth group at church, helped out at church, and so on. But even she, when I asked her, wasn't sure she was going to wait till marriage!

The amount of sex going on a World youth day in Sydney surprised me, I expected a million waiters like me...no such luck!

Personally, I think people stop being Catholic because they don't bother to learn anything about the faith. The more I learn about my faith, the stronger it gets, but if you never bother to learn, then your faith is going to crumble, because this world is hardly Catholic-friendly! You really have to want to believe.

xxx

It was exactly the opposite for me, the more I learned about the catholic faith the more I decided it wasn't for me.

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Raised by devoted christian parents and became a devoted christian myself until 7-8 years ago when I became an atheist.

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I was raised Catholic-As a baby I was baptised, around 6/7 I did my first Confession, followed shortly thereafter by my first Holy Communion and when I was 16 I had my Confirmation.

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I was baptised Chrstian-United, and went to Sunday School when I was very young. As I got older the only time we would go to church was on Christmas eve. When I was 15, I started going to a youth group and then shortly after became Christian-Alliance. I was then baptised again in this church voluntarily.

I had a falling out with the pastor of my church as he and I had different ideas about acceptance of non-believers. I have since parted ways with the church. I will always, have always believed in God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit, the Virgin Birth, all of that. I just don't believe that people MUST listen to as pastor and that there is no room for rational interpretation.

I will always believe in God, I just choose not to be a part of a church. That said, I still enjoy church, and do go when needed. I think that too many people have an outright fear of religion, or they do believe there is room outside of absolutes. I question religion because there is a lot of room for interpretation. That said, I never attack someone's religion or their God. To each their own.

I do believe that people should question religion as it does not hold ALL of the answers. This is merely my opinion.

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I was raised as an active Christian, had a falling out with the faith, due to the whole exclusivity of salvation issue. Found Islam far more appealing, though I have explored other faiths and do occasionally hang out at a Buddhist monastery on the weekends. I'm not sure if I'd be considered religious in the traditional sense. I feel more spiritual than religious (at least in so far as 'religious' is typically used). And yes, I am a convert (of sorts) to Islam, so I did change religions.

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