Jegsy Scarr

Ask a Catholic! (i.e, me...)

300 posts in this topic

Does the Catolic religion allow people to convert from other religions? For example, Islamic to Catholic? Not that conversion in specific though.

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Does the Catolic religion allow people to convert from other religions? For example, Islamic to Catholic? Not that conversion in specific though.

 

Absolutely! You can convert to Catholicism if you're a non-Catholic Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Jewish, Buddhist, Sikh, Atheist, Agnostic, Scientologist, Wiccan, Satanist - basically, anything. Regardless of your past, you can always choose to start over.

 

xxx

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How does the Catholic Church or religion view other religions? Do they view them as all incorrect or what?

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How does the Catholic Church or religion view other religions? Do they view them as all incorrect or what?

 

Not exactly. The Catholic Church would consider themselves to have the fullness of truth. Other religions are going to have different beliefs, but they'll also have a lot in common. Jews and Muslims believe in the same God we do, although they don't believe in the Trinity. Other Christians will share most of their beliefs with us, and aren't that different. The Eastern Orthodox church shares a lot of our beliefs and teachings, and even had valid sacraments, but reject the authority of the Pope, so are very very close to us. Almost every religion will share some beliefs with us, like respect for human life, being respectful to others, and so on. So we like to try and find the elements of truth in different religions, rather than just say every other religion is "wrong". It doesn't mean we don't think it's important to try and bring people into the Catholic Church, but it's not really helpful to just say that a religion is wrong, and ignore everything it gets right.

 

xxx

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How does a Catholic view Athiests or Agnostics? A person that is Catholic and no longer my friend preached to me on how evil I am for being an Agnostic and more.

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How does a Catholic view Athiests or Agnostics? A person that is Catholic and no longer my friend preached to me on how evil I am for being an Agnostic and more.

 

Wow, that's not very Christian. I'm sure they meant well, but that's definitely not the way to go.

 

We view atheists and agnostics as fellow human beings, and treat them as such. Our beliefs might differ, but we should still treat them with respect. They're certainly not "evil" just because they have different beliefs. There are good Catholics and good atheists, bad Catholics and bad atheists. 

 

xxx

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More of a question directed at you and not the religion over all, how many times have you read the bible?

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More of a question directed at you and not the religion over all, how many times have you read the bible?

 

Well, the Bible's read at Mass every week, so I've been through the Gospels and most of the more "major" books several times over the course of my life. Currently, I'm reading through the entire Bible over the course of the year, so I'll have covered everything. But saying that, it's only fairly recently (in the last two or three years, maybe) that I've become "serious" in getting to know my faith.

 

I think Catholics are kind of infamous for not reading the Bible as much as other Christians. Part of that is because Catholics, as I've said before, don't believe that the Bible is the only source of authority. We've also got the Church and Sacred Tradition. So I personally tend to study more about what the Church teaches about X Y and Z, teachings on morality, ethics, sexuality, marriage etc. and how to apply them to everyday life, and so on. The Bible's very important, too, but it's from the Bible that teachings are based. If you believe that the Bible is the only source of authority, then you read the Bible in order to work out the rights and wrongs of something. But for Catholics, it tends to be the opposite: you'd study Church teachings of something, and then see how the Bible backs this up.

 

Some Catholics read the Bible every single day, and others don't. It really depends on the person.

 

xxx

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Interesting! I read half the Bible back when I went to Sunday School and the entire Qur'an.

In the Catholic religion is it required to read the Bible?

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Interesting! I read half the Bible back when I went to Sunday School and the entire Qur'an.

In the Catholic religion is it required to read the Bible?

 

Well, it's not required, per se, but it's highly encouraged. Just to quote the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

 

 

The Church "forcefully and specifically exhorts all the Christian faithful. . . to learn the surpassing knowledge of Jesus Christ, by frequent reading of the divine Scriptures. Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.

 

Like I said, though, you hear the Bible read at every Mass, and it is required to go to Mass every Sunday, so it's not as if Catholics never hear the Bible, even if they don't read it themselves at home. But if you're serious about your faith, then reading the Bible is something you should do.

 

xxx

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What if you don't go to Mass every Sunday?

 

That'd be a mortal sin. Catholics are required to go to Mass at least every Sunday and on holy days of obligation (Christmas, Easter, etc.) You can go more often if you like, but that's the minimum requirement. If you miss Mass, it's a mortal sin, as long as you've no serious reason for missing it (e.g. you're sick, you have to care for sick relatives, you can't get time off work, you're travelling, and so on).

 

xxx

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No offense or anything, but it seems a bit extreme to call it a mortal sin for not attempting a church on Sundays, I mean if you have faith, not going to Mass shouldn't hold such penalties.

But if not going to Mass is a sin unless you have other things such as work, wouldn't that be a sin, working on Sunday, which is supposed to be a day of rest?

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No offense or anything, but it seems a bit extreme to call it a mortal sin for not attempting a church on Sundays, I mean if you have faith, not going to Mass shouldn't hold such penalties.

 

Fair enough, that's your opinion. To Catholics, though, it's not extreme at all.

 

Think of it like this: Say you have a friend. Say one day, you're walking back home together after a night out, and suddenly a group of men surround you. They're a sadistic group, who'd like nothing better than to beat you to a bloody pulp and leave you for dead, and they grab you before you can stop them. But your friend calls out to them, and pleads with them not to hurt you. If they're going to kill anyone, then they should kill him instead. So they let go of you, and instead start attacking your friend. They subject him to the worst pain imaginable, until they leave him, heavily wounded and bleeding profusely, lying in the street. The ambulance comes, but he's too badly injured, and he dies several hours later, his last moments spent in agony.

 

A few days later, your friend's father calls you. He lets you know that his son's funeral will be on Sunday, and he hopes you can make it. You tell the father that you're very sorry about what happened, and your thoughts are with him and his family, but you won't be at the funeral. You have other things you could be doing that day which are also important to you. Besides, it's not important that you're there. You don't have to prove anything to anyone: you know that you loved and cared about your friend, and you're very thankful that he gave his life to save you. So there's no reason for his father to expect you to come.

 

Obviously, you wouldn't do that. Of course you'll be there. You wouldn't miss it for the world. And if they're going to have a memorial service every year for him, then you'll be there every year. Heck, if they held one every week and asked you to come, how could you say no? How could you tell the father that his son's sacrifice isn't even worth an hour of your week?

 

That's kind of what Catholics think of about Mass. You don't just miss it.

 

 

But if not going to Mass is a sin unless you have other things such as work, wouldn't that be a sin, working on Sunday, which is supposed to be a day of rest?

 

Ideally, you should schedule your work so that you can attend Mass every week. In the old days, most shops and businesses didn't open on Sundays, so it'd be fairly easy to find a job that would allow you to go to Mass, and even spend the whole day with your family. Nowadays, that's not always possible. It's difficult to get a job, and you sometimes have to take what's available. Saying that, you're obliged to go to Mass on Sunday (any time of the day), but most churches also have what's called a "vigil Mass". These take place on Saturday evenings, and also fulfil the Sunday obligation (similar to in Judaism, where the Sabbath begins at sundown the previous day). The same is true of holy days of obligation.

 

If you still can't make Mass any time from Saturday night to Sunday night, then there's not much you can do. If you don't go to work, you'll lose your job. It's more important that you support your family. It's good to go to Mass if you possibly can, but your family has to eat.

 

xxx

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Alight that's it for my pestering questions for now, but ill return with more!

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Who's your favorite saint? Whats your favorite devotion / prayer / Novena? Have you visited / seen any saint relics / Incorrupt body? Sorry for so many questions lol

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Who's your favorite saint? Whats your favorite devotion / prayer / Novena? Have you visited / seen any saint relics / Incorrupt body? Sorry for so many questions lol

 

Oh, love this question!

 

Well, I don't know if I can pick just one favourite saint...My confirmation saint is St Catherine of Siena, who is just really awesome. She's a Doctor of the Church, and she's written some pretty great stuff. Plus, she had visions, stigmata, and her body is incorrupt, which is all very cool.

 

I also really love St Lawrence, who laughed all the way through his martyrdom. That's a pretty amazing feat. And my two favourite modern saints are St Maria Goretti and St Gianna Molla. There are lots of other saints I love, but those are probably my favourites...

 

Favourite prayers...Well, you can never go wrong with the Rosary! I love the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, too. I don't really tend to pray Novenas, though, at least not very often. I tend to just go with saying the Memorare.

 

I would love to go to Siena some some day and see St Catherine. At our local parish, there's a relic of St Blaise. And I think I visited a church once which claimed to have a fragment of the cross, but I don't know for sure. 

 

xxx

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Nice Choices. My Favourite saint would be Padre Pio. He Suffered the wounds of Christ, Could read souls during confession, billocation and performed various miracles during his priest hood. He did levitate many times too because there used to be a massive cue before he arrived at confession and couldn't make it through the crowd. He also prophesied on the " 3 days of darkness"

Padre pio also healed Gemma Di Giorgi of her blindness. She had no pupils in her eyes but she can still see perfectly after she visited padre pio the story is below...

http://www.padrepiodevotions.org/2002april.asp

The most amazing thing about him was his devotion to Blessed Virgin Mary and managed to pray the Rosary atleast 35 times per day Entire 15 decades just how the rosary should be prayed ( as it matches the 150 psalms in the bible). He wouldn't sleep at night and prayed the rosary instead. He barely slept 2 or 3 hours per day. His Body is still in corrupt to this very day.





My other favourites would be St. Francis of Assisi ( I love that prayer Lord make me an instrument of your peace..), St. Bernadette the famous Lourdes Apparitions, St. Margarita María Alacoque who received the famous sacred heart devotion, St. Therese of Lisieux.

http://www.theholyrosary.org/sacredheart

The Rosary is just amazing. the peace, relaxation is just unmatched. The most powerful prayer as they say about the Rosary you will either put an end to your sins or you will stop praying you can't do both. " A Family that prays together stays together"

The constant reminder of the Life,death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ and prayer for the fruits of the spirit is just amazing :)

Other favourites would be Chaplet of divine Mercy and Chaplet of St. Michael, Stations of the cross. I really like the Novena to the sacred Heart of Jesus.

Something Amazing about the Rosary below:

On August 6, 1945 during World War II, an atomic bomb was dropped on the town of Hiroshima, Japan. 140,000 people were killed or injured. There was a home eight blocks (about 1 kilometer) from where the A-Bomb went off . This home had a church attached to it which was completely destroyed, but the home survived, and so did the eight German Jesuit missionaries who prayed the rosary in that house faithfully every day. These men were missionaries to the Japanese people, they were non-military, but because Germany and Japan were allies during WWII they were permitted to live and minister within Japan during the war.

Not only did they all survive with (at most) relatively minor injuries, but they all lived well past that awful day with no radiation sickness, no loss of hearing, or any other visible long term defects or maladies. Naturally, they were interviewed and examined numerous times (Fr. Schiffer, a survivor, said over 200 times) by scientists and health care people about their remarkable experience and they say "we believe that we survived because we were living the message of Fatima. We lived and prayed the rosary daily in that home."

 

http://miraculousrosary.blogspot.com/p/famous-rosary-miracles.html

Promise number 6 of the praying the rosary everyday

6. Whoever shall recite the Rosary devoutly, applying himself to the consideration of its Sacred Mysteries shall never be conquered by misfortune. God will not chastise him in His justice, he shall not perish by an unprovided death; if he be just, he shall remain in the grace of God, and become worthy of eternal life.

I've visited St. Francis Xavier's relic and it was amazing. The fact they used lime which actually decomposes your body faster than normal his body still managed to remain incorrupt for over 500 years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3ALime_(material)

I would love to visit Lourdes some day to See St. Bernadette's Relic. Incorrupt saints are just divine intervention and are living miracles. I love reading about their stories and their sacrifices they made would want to live life like that free from materialism and grow spiritually :)

http://www.francisxaviers.com/sainthistory.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Xavier

http://www.miraclesofthechurch.com/2010/10/raised-from-dead-saints-who-brought.html

This is a great thread :)

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Favorite season in catholic calender and why?

 

Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, and Pentecost

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Favorite season in catholic calender and why?

 

Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, and Pentecost

 

Ooh! I think I'd say Easter. The Easter vigil Mass is always really cool, with the candles and whatnot. Although I love the Christmas Eve Mass, too, so...That's a tough one...

 

xxx

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Tons of Roman Catholics don't actually follow most of the teachings of the denomination (They use birth control, support gay marriage, don't go to mass, don't go to confession, ect....). In your opinion, should they keep saying that they are Roman Catholic, even though they don't agree with the teachings? Or should they leave the denomination if they aren't going to follow it's teachings?

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Tons of Roman Catholics don't actually follow most of the teachings of the denomination (They use birth control, support gay marriage, don't go to mass, don't go to confession, ect....). In your opinion, should they keep saying that they are Roman Catholic, even though they don't agree with the teachings? Or should they leave the denomination if they aren't going to follow it's teachings?

 

In my opinion? Well, technically, you're Catholic if you've been baptised in the Catholic faith, but that doesn't necessarily mean than you're a faithful Catholic. I have to say that it bothers me when people who don't follow the faith, especially on serious issues, say that they're Catholic. It's not so bad if they're just regular Joes, but I can't stand it when you have politicians or people in the media who openly dissent from Church teachings, but still say they're Catholic.

 

One in particular who I can think of, mentioning no names *cough*piersmorgan*cough* is often on TV, openly supports same-sex 'marriage', women's ordination, and contraception, and yet still says he's a Catholic. He'll say things like, "I am Catholic, and I am appalled at how the Church has failed to modernise its teachings". Now, as a Catholic, one of the main things he should believe in is that the Church speaks for God: if you don't believe that, why would you want to be Catholic? So if he believes that, he wouldn't be asking the Church to change her teachings. Actually, he's in direct opposition with what the Church teaches on so many issues that I'm kind of struggling to find anything he does agree with the Church on.

 

In cases like that, I'd kind of appreciate if people didn't lie and say, "Yes I'm Catholic (but I disagree with all the Church's main teachings)", and just say, "I used to be Catholic", or something. It's pretty frustrating, because it just reflects badly on Catholics.

 

As for whether or not people should leave the Church altogether, that depends what you mean by "leave" the Church. As I said, once you're baptised Catholic, technically, you can't ever "leave". It's not like you sign a paper or something renouncing your position. But people do leave in the sense of going to another church, or just not practising any more. And no, I wouldn't want anyone to leave, per se. If people are genuinely struggling with a teaching of the Church, but are trying to understand it, then I think they should remain Catholic, try to learn more, pray about the issue, and hopefully they'll be able to work it out. If they are deliberately living in opposition with something the Church teaches (using contraception, having sex outside of marriage), then the problem is that they'd be in a state of mortal sin. It'd be okay for them to go to Mass, but they couldn't receive communion while in that state (receiving the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin is in itself a mortal sin). 

 

xxx

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I meant more of a Piers Morgan situation (but a regular person, not a celebrity). They openly disagree with and don't follow some teachings of Roman Catholocism, but still call themselves Catholic. Would you say they should also say they used to be Catholic?

Also, as I'm sure you know, people obviously disagree that they can't leave Roman Catholocism just because that's how they were baptized as a baby. People leave and join other denominations all the time.

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I meant more of a Piers Morgan situation (but a regular person, not a celebrity). They openly disagree with and don't follow some teachings of Roman Catholocism, but still call themselves Catholic. Would you say they should also say they used to be Catholic?

Also, as I'm sure you know, people obviously disagree that they can't leave Roman Catholocism just because that's how they were baptized as a baby. People leave and join other denominations all the time.

 

Well, people do leave and go to other churches sometimes if they really disagree with the Church's teachings. But honestly, I wouldn't want anyone to leave the Church. If they did, I'd hope it'd be as a last resort, and not just, "I disagree with this one issue, but instead of sticking around and trying to work it out, I'm just going to leave the Church altogether". It's always sad to see people falling away from the faith.

 

But, saying that, it's been noted that sometimes when people leave the Church, they end up returning months or years later after they are unsatisfied with their new church. It doesn't always happen, but sometimes leaving the Church turns out to be a good thing. But it's not a guarantee, and I'd much rather people stayed in the Catholic Church even if they had disagreements. There's always hope that they can sort those disagreements out.

 

xxx

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