Guest Rain

Would you marry someone of a different religion?

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I'm Muslim and I would. No, it doesn't mean my faith means any less to me, because it is a very important part of my life and I would never sacrifice it. All it means is, I can't help who I might fall in love with and if he happens to have a different religion, well then I'd be willing to accept that, as long as there was mutual respect. I wouldn't interfere with his and I'd ask him not to with mine. Unless he asked me to teach him and considered converting, then yes I would help him. My question is, would you marry someone who had a different religion? Why or why not?

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Nope. That's something that I won't change my mind about. He has to be Christian.

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No. We would be good friends but for marriage having the same religion would be important for me. Marriage is a union and for me religion would have to be the same to still be a union; a difference would provide a discourd. I would worry about our children's denomination and depending on what type of religion the guy followed that could be a very sticky situation.

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I don't think so. A few doctrinal differences between us could make for interesting conversations, but without shared foundational values, it simply wouldn't work out between us. I don't really care if they're Baptist, or Russian Orthodox, or Coptic, or Messianic, or Roman Catholic, or maybe even a snake handler (well...okay, that might be a stretch)--but if we don't share the fundamental belief that the universe was created by the benevolent God of the Old and New Testaments, it's hard to believe we'll find much more in common. Practicality aside, it's a tenet of my religion not to marry someone of a different faith, so even if I wanted to, I couldn't without compromising my values.

EDIT: As loyalhero90 stated, though, I eagerly welcome friendship from people of all faiths. I just draw the line at romance.

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Definitely not what I expected to see, but I guess if it's your opinions I obviously respect them.

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My religion is very important to me too. I just have an open mind when it comes to others and their beliefs, I don't necessarily agree with it, but it would not be a deal breaker so long as I wasn't forced to believe what they believe.

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April, I think alot of it has to do with the Christian doctrinal belief that we, as Christians, should not be "unequally yoked." Most Christians (like myself) take that to mean, for one thing, not to marry someone who is not a follower of Christ. It's nothing against your faith or anyone's faith, or lack thereof. I will readily associate with and be friends with members of other faiths, but not being a Christian is my one and only dealbreaker. I can overlook a lot of things, we can have doctrinal differences, denominational differences, political differences (well, within reason :P haha) etc., and sure I have many preferences; but that's the one thing I can't, as a Christian, compromise on.

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April, I think alot of it has to do with the Christian doctrinal belief that we, as Christians, should not be "unequally yoked." Most Christians (like myself) take that to mean, for one thing, not to marry someone who is not a follower of Christ. It's nothing against your faith or anyone's faith, or lack thereof. I will readily associate with and be friends with members of other faiths, but not being a Christian is my one and only dealbreaker. I can overlook a lot of things, we can have doctrinal differences, denominational differences, political differences (well, within reason :P haha) etc., and sure I have many preferences; but that's the one thing I can't, as a Christian, compromise on.

exactly-i think several may be meaning it in this way April

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As long as he's an atheist, he can be from a Jewish family or a Christian family or a Scientology family (okay, maybe not that.) Atheism is a must, only because that's how I want to raise my children. Well...I suppose if he was nonreligious and didn't care...then yeah, maybe that would be okay. But even my nonreligious mom was furious with my dad for teaching me atheism (although she did fully agree to bring me up Jewish.) But he CAN'T be from a religious family because I know how grandparents can be overly involved with their grandchildren's lives and I don't want them to influence my children in any way.

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Some religions actually teach that you should only marry someone of the same faith. Yes, some interfaith marriages can work, but I would say they are few and far between. I don't think a bond between a couple with two different faiths can be as strong as one where both share the same one. Having the same values are almost a must in a successful relationship and one's religion plays a central part in those values.

Like EC was saying, I am very open to having friends of different faiths, but not my future wife. Slight doctrinal differences is fine with me. I would have no problem marrying a Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbytarian, etc. But definitely not a Ladder Day Saint (Mormon) or Jehovah's Witness. Nothing against them, but I the theological differences is far too great. I'm kind of undecided when it comes to Catholics though. To me, they would fall somewhere between slight and major differences in theology. I guess what I'm trying to say is at the very least, I'm not 100% against the possibility of marrying a Catholic.

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I don't think a bond between a couple with two different faiths can be as strong as one where both share the same one.

I do agree with that, at least in the case of children. Like I said, my nonreligious mom fully agreed to raise me to be a part of the Jewish faith but she still taught me the religious aspect of Christmas and Easter (I forget both, but it did happen.) Like she was very supportive of the Judaism in my family, yet she did buy me some children's books that educate you about Jesus' story (they say that he is the son of God which Jews do not believe) and even bought me this Christian sing-along book with songs (you press the button and the tune plays and the lyrics are in the book.) My mom seems very nonreligious - I don't think she's gone to a church on Sunday since she moved out of the house for university in her youth, she's never read the bible, she can't recite a bible verse word-for-word, etc. But I think she was super ticked off with my dad teaching me atheism. I think she tried to reverse it but I am a very stubborn girl.

So yes, when it comes to different religions, that can be highly problematic in a marriage when involving children. Even if you agree to half-Christian, half-Jewish, do you teach your child that Jesus is the son of God or not? Because Jews do not believe Jesus was divine, and Christianity does (correct?) Now imagine a religion with a completely different God (or Gods) and a completely different story.

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Sorry, my relationship with God is WAAAY to big a part of my life to not be able to share that with my future wife.

So no, I couldn't marry someone who had different views. If, however, I'd been married already before I converted to Christianity and my wife wanted to not change, I wouldn't hold it against her in any way and would respect it.

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April, I think alot of it has to do with the Christian doctrinal belief that we, as Christians, should not be "unequally yoked." Most Christians (like myself) take that to mean, for one thing, not to marry someone who is not a follower of Christ. It's nothing against your faith or anyone's faith, or lack thereof. I will readily associate with and be friends with members of other faiths, but not being a Christian is my one and only dealbreaker. I can overlook a lot of things, we can have doctrinal differences, denominational differences, political differences (well, within reason :P haha) etc., and sure I have many preferences; but that's the one thing I can't, as a Christian, compromise on.

This is pretty much me too. I just can't compromise on the most important relationship in my life, the one with Jesus Christ.

Edit: I'm not saying that I won't give a guy a chance if he's not a Christian, but he has to have a strong faith in God, and walk the walk not just talk the talk. And we can't be too different about main things.

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I'd much prefer to marry another Catholic. I'm not saying I'd never marry someone of another faith, but I think it'd be very unlikely. If I was going to marry a non-Catholic, then he'd have to agree to raise our kids Catholic. If he was non-religious (although I don't see myself ever marrying someone who didn't believe in God), or of another religion but not really practising, it might work.

But you get the problem. Most religions say you have to try and bring up your kids in the same faith. And just as I don't want to compromise on my faith, I don't want to make my husband have to compromise on his. So...honestly, I think I'd have to marry another Catholic, if I'm being realistic about it.

xxx

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April, I think alot of it has to do with the Christian doctrinal belief that we, as Christians, should not be "unequally yoked." Most Christians (like myself) take that to mean, for one thing, not to marry someone who is not a follower of Christ. It's nothing against your faith or anyone's faith, or lack thereof. I will readily associate with and be friends with members of other faiths, but not being a Christian is my one and only dealbreaker. I can overlook a lot of things, we can have doctrinal differences, denominational differences, political differences (well, within reason :P haha) etc., and sure I have many preferences; but that's the one thing I can't, as a Christian, compromise on.

Oh, okay. I understand. Thanks for your honest answer :)

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exactly-i think several may be meaning it in this way April

Oh, I see now. Thank you for your answer :)

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As long as he's an atheist, he can be from a Jewish family or a Christian family or a Scientology family (okay, maybe not that.) Atheism is a must, only because that's how I want to raise my children. Well...I suppose if he was nonreligious and didn't care...then yeah, maybe that would be okay. But even my nonreligious mom was furious with my dad for teaching me atheism (although she did fully agree to bring me up Jewish.) But he CAN'T be from a religious family because I know how grandparents can be overly involved with their grandchildren's lives and I don't want them to influence my children in any way.


I now know what you mean by major differences in beliefs. Thanks for your answer :)

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Some religions actually teach that you should only marry someone of the same faith. Yes, some interfaith marriages can work, but I would say they are few and far between. I don't think a bond between a couple with two different faiths can be as strong as one where both share the same one. Having the same values are almost a must in a successful relationship and one's religion plays a central part in those values.

Like EC was saying, I am very open to having friends of different faiths, but not my future wife. Slight doctrinal differences is fine with me. I would have no problem marrying a Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbytarian, etc. But definitely not a Ladder Day Saint (Mormon) or Jehovah's Witness. Nothing against them, but I the theological differences is far too great. I'm kind of undecided when it comes to Catholics though. To me, they would fall somewhere between slight and major differences in theology. I guess what I'm trying to say is at the very least, I'm not 100% against the possibility of marrying a Catholic.


I also believe that some can work, maybe rarely but there's hope. Thanks for your answer :)

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Sorry, my relationship with God is WAAAY to big a part of my life to not be able to share that with my future wife.

So no, I couldn't marry someone who had different views. If, however, I'd been married already before I converted to Christianity and my wife wanted to not change, I wouldn't hold it against her in any way and would respect it.

Okay, thanks for your answer.

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As someone who's not religious I wouldn't marry someone who was very strongly religious - she can believe how she wants whatever I don't care, the problem comes when she tries to convert me etc, and we'd have to agree on things like how children will be raised.

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This is pretty much me too. I just can't compromise on the most important relationship in my life, the one with Jesus Christ.

Thank you for your answer :)

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I'd much prefer to marry another Catholic. I'm not saying I'd never marry someone of another faith, but I think it'd be very unlikely. If I was going to marry a non-Catholic, then he'd have to agree to raise our kids Catholic. If he was non-religious (although I don't see myself ever marrying someone who didn't believe in God), or of another religion but not really practising, it might work.

But you get the problem. Most religions say you have to try and bring up your kids in the same faith. And just as I don't want to compromise on my faith, I don't want to make my husband have to compromise on his. So...honestly, I think I'd have to marry another Catholic, if I'm being realistic about it.

xxx


Good point. Thanks for your answer :)

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As someone who's not religious I wouldn't marry someone who was very strongly religious - she can believe how she wants whatever I don't care, the problem comes when she tries to convert me etc, and we'd have to agree on things like how children will be raised.

I see. Thank you for your answer :)

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no-i wouldn't be willing. My faith is an uncompromisable factor for me.

Nope. That's something that I won't change my mind about. He has to be Christian.

No. We would be good friends but for marriage having the same religion would be important for me. Marriage is a union and for me religion would have to be the same to still be a union; a difference would provide a discourd. I would worry about our children's denomination and depending on what type of religion the guy followed that could be a very sticky situation.

I don't think so. A few doctrinal differences between us could make for interesting conversations, but without shared foundational values, it simply wouldn't work out between us. I don't really care if they're Baptist, or Russian Orthodox, or Coptic, or Messianic, or Roman Catholic, or maybe even a snake handler (well...okay, that might be a stretch)--but if we don't share the fundamental belief that the universe was created by the benevolent God of the Old and New Testaments, it's hard to believe we'll find much more in common. Practicality aside, it's a tenet of my religion not to marry someone of a different faith, so even if I wanted to, I couldn't without compromising my values.

EDIT: As loyalhero90 stated, though, I eagerly welcome friendship from people of all faiths. I just draw the line at romance.

April, I think alot of it has to do with the Christian doctrinal belief that we, as Christians, should not be "unequally yoked." Most Christians (like myself) take that to mean, for one thing, not to marry someone who is not a follower of Christ. It's nothing against your faith or anyone's faith, or lack thereof. I will readily associate with and be friends with members of other faiths, but not being a Christian is my one and only dealbreaker. I can overlook a lot of things, we can have doctrinal differences, denominational differences, political differences (well, within reason :P haha) etc., and sure I have many preferences; but that's the one thing I can't, as a Christian, compromise on.

Some religions actually teach that you should only marry someone of the same faith. Yes, some interfaith marriages can work, but I would say they are few and far between. I don't think a bond between a couple with two different faiths can be as strong as one where both share the same one. Having the same values are almost a must in a successful relationship and one's religion plays a central part in those values.

Like EC was saying, I am very open to having friends of different faiths, but not my future wife. Slight doctrinal differences is fine with me. I would have no problem marrying a Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbytarian, etc. But definitely not a Ladder Day Saint (Mormon) or Jehovah's Witness. Nothing against them, but I the theological differences is far too great. I'm kind of undecided when it comes to Catholics though. To me, they would fall somewhere between slight and major differences in theology. I guess what I'm trying to say is at the very least, I'm not 100% against the possibility of marrying a Catholic.

This is pretty much me too. I just can't compromise on the most important relationship in my life, the one with Jesus Christ.

ALL OF THIS!!! Hahaha, I love when I can get into a thread and I have so many thoughts, but not as many ideas as to how to express them in a coherent manner, and y'all have already done the work for me!! We are all so different, yet very similar here and I love that about us! :)

I'll add my own input, though so I don't look like some bum who can't think hahah.

I would not marry someone of a different religion. Christianity is a strict must and something I will not compromise, no matter how much I may enjoy relating with a person. We can be friends, we can be close friends, we can learn from one another, and share our differences, however... I couldn't see myself romantically involved with this person. My Christian faith is such a major part of my core and the center from which I operate, truthfully. To compromise that for the sake of a relationship would be like compromising who I am, and clearly I hold strong to who I am. I wouldn't judge them or dislike them for their faith, though. Denominational differences wouldn't bother me too much (I don't believe-- I haven't ever had a serious relationship and before I "died"--seriously I'll never be the same as before-- in February and came back alive and absolutely in LOVE with God and His saving grace-- I never really discussed my religious beliefs with someone I was romantically involved with) as long as he believes Jesus is the Son of God who died and rose again for our sins, I wouldn't see too much of an issue. With that being said, I grew up in an Assembly of God church, then went to non-denominational churches, and now go to a Baptist church that I absolutely love and am spiritually nourished in. I really want to go to church (and Bible study and have prayer) with my husband, so I hope that we at least have some of the same viewpoints there. I have met couples who are married, both Christian, but different denominations, and there is a divide there because their churches are so different from one another. I think that ultimately, that would bother me just because I want us to be on the same page. I think that's why a lot of people can find their soulmate at church, for those of us who are believers. There's just that common ground there, and it solidifies a foundation on which to build a strong, lasting relationship that could (and seems like often does) lead to marriage. I'm a 1 Peter 4:8 kind of woman and I believe that it really does show in my life. I have friends of many different backgrounds, faiths, and even sexual orientations. I may never see their point of view, and certainly won't agree with them, but I will always love them. As a Christian, that's what I'm commanded to do, and since I truly love God with all that I have, I do what He commands. So... To try and keep this short (haha I'm so long winded, sorry y'all! *blush*) no, I couldn't marry someone of a different religion. Hahah. Ah, I make myself laugh with the detail I put into the replies, here and it's funny because I don't actually talk much unless I'm really comfortable with a person or people. But I can write for days. :)

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